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Fedora 7 Release Adds Installable KDE Live CD

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Linux

The Fedora Project has announced the immediate availability of their latest release, Fedora 7 (Moonshine) including, for the first time, a KDE live CD/DVD showcasing KDE and KDE applications, which can also be installed to the hard disk, resulting in a regular Fedora installation with KDE. Along with other current software, Fedora 7 includes KDE 3.5.6. Unfortunately, KDE 3.5.7 was released too late to be included in Fedora 7, however it will be made available as an update. The 32-bit version fits on a 700 MB CD, the 64-bit version needs DVD or special overlong CD media for space reasons. KDE is also included on the traditional installer DVD. KDE in Fedora 7 defaults to the default KDE look and feel, with Plastik as the widget theme and CrystalSVG as the icon theme.

Full Story.


Red Hat users have long been able to select the packages they want to install on their systems. The latest Fedora release improves that customization and puts Red Hat squarely in the face of custom Linux appliance builders, such as rPath, that have recently begun to challenge Red Hat's dominance in the Linux market.

Fedora 7, released today, allows users to build their own custom versions of Red Hat's community Linux offering using tools Red Hat is open sourcing.

Customize Your New Red Hat Fedora



On May 31, Red Hat's sponsored and community supported open source Fedora Project released the latest version of its distribution: Fedora 7. Besides being a cutting edge Linux distribution, it features a new build capability that enables users to create their own custom distributions.

Fedora 7 now boasts a completely open-source build process that greatly simplifies the creation of appliances and distributions that can be targeted to meet individual needs.

Highly flexible Fedora 7 Linux arrives


Well, Fedora 7 was fun. Now we get to think about Fedora 8.

FIRST: we're going to start tracking release dates for Fedora much more aggressively. The current goal: release Fedora twice a year, at Halloween and May Day, every year. Which means a short release cycle this time 'round, so we basically have zero time to hang out and enjoy it too much. Preliminary release schedule is here (although the wiki is superslow right now, so you may want to wait a day or two to check it out).

SECOND:

Fedora 8

Proposed Fedora 8 Release Schedule.

Cool beans

Well that makes me a happy camper. Can't wait to test drive Fedora 7 KDE edition. I love their announcemnet. Too funny!

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