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Editing audio for the web: a beginner’s guide

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You only need to look at the iTunes top 100 podcast chart to see how print media are embracing the possibilities of audio. Fortunately, you don't have to be a Guardian Unlimited or a New Scientist, or have a megabucks studio and a team of experts to get basic audio ready for the web.

Audacity is a cheap (ie free) and cheerful piece of audio editing software that''ll work on Windows, Macs and apparently Linux. All you need is a computer with a sound card... and some audio to edit.

We took a six-minute clip of the Press Gazette editor narrating a piece on the Telegraph's newsroom hub (blogs.pressgazette/editor) to show some of the key features in Audacity. The piece was recorded in a small room with walls made of paper: as a result the levels were all over the place.

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