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Macintosh…Help me understand why

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Mac
Ubuntu

I can feel them…the flames…they’re coming. But I have to ask this question again (yes, I’ve asked one very much like it before) in light of recent events. The recent events, of course, involve the release of a particular Linux distribution with a funny African sort of name and, maybe more significantly, the first tier-one vendor’s adoption of said funny-sounding distro as an OS choice.

Macintosh, on the other hand, is becoming increasingly focused on consumer appliances (oh yeah, AppleTV, that has applications in the classroom), notebooks (even their “budget” Macbooks are running Core 2 Duos), and high-end workstations (rumors are flying about the demise of the Mac Mini and the 17″ iMac). While I’ll be the first to admit that OS X is a truly elegant operating system and that both Mac hardware and software are full of useful little features and innovations, so is Kubuntu. And Xubuntu. Sorry, not loving Gnome so much lately, so I’m leaving the actual funny-African-named distro off the list, but I can’t say enough good stuff about Edubuntu.

Full Story.



Troll Alert

> "I can feel them…the flames…they’re coming."

That's just why I'd never link to his blog. He bashes Linux, too. Got to know who to avoid 'feeding'... they get paid for traffic they attract.

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