Language Selection

English French German Italian Portuguese Spanish

Lies, damn lies, and statistics

Filed under
OSS

I don't normally head over to Groklaw, but I did recently based on some other links and came across an article about a study conducted by Microsoft on how developers don't want the GLP, version 3, to "police patents." If you dig a little deeper into the study, the following facts about the study are exposed:

1. It was conducted by email.

2. 354 emails were sent out between Feb 28 and April 4 2007.

3. 332 reached their destination.

4. 34, or slightly more than 10%, responded.

Now, PJ chose a particularly inflammatory (some might even go so far as to say trolling) title: "Only 11% of OS Targeted Programmers Willing to Help MS-Funded Study." And that's because Microsoft did indeed fund yet another study seeking to bolster their position with regards to the GPLv3. I don't see it quite that way. I see that only 10% of the targeted group (according to my simple math skills) bothered to respond (frankly, for reasons unknown). And those 34 bear the heavy responsibility of representing the rest of us who either refused to respond or who were never even contacted. Great responsibility indeed.

More Here.



We can trust Novell and Microsoft

After all, they used similar tricks to show us using a a survey that customers 'loved' the deal. The ethics at Novell are on par with Microsoft's and SCO's.

Comment viewing options

Select your preferred way to display the comments and click "Save settings" to activate your changes.

More in Tux Machines

Security News

New Input Drivers and TinyDRM in Linux 4.11 Kernel

  • New Input Drivers For The Linux 4.11 Kernel
    Dmitry Torokhov has submitted the input feature updates for the Linux 4.11 kernel merge window. One of the new input drivers for Linux 4.11 is the Zeitech touchscreen controller. The new Zeitec driver is zet6223 and supports the ZET6223 I2C touchscreen controller. Another new driver is for Samsung "touchkeys." The Samsung Touchkey support is the new tm2-touchkey driver and allows for touch key and LED functionality on the Exynos 5433 TM2 development board.
  • TinyDRM Queued For Linux 4.11
    TinyDRM has been queued in DRM-Next for landing with the in-development Linux 4.11 kernel. TinyDRM aims to provide "a very simplified view of DRM for displays that has onboard video memory and is connected through a slow bus like SPI/I2C." TinyDRM includes SPI and MIPI-DBI support.

Latvian Ventspils controls costs with open source

The administration of Ventspils, Latvia’s sixth largest city, is an avid user of free and open source software. The main benefits: cost and resource optimisation. Read more

Ubuntu Touch finds a home on a conflict-free, fair-trade, user-maintainable handset

Handset maker Fairphone is teaming up with the community project UBports, which seeks to get Ubuntu Touch on mobile devices. They will be showing off Ubuntu Touch running on the Fairphone 2 during Mobile World Congress, which starts February 27 in Barcelona. While Ubuntu is probably not the first name that comes to mind when you think of mobile devices, the phone in question offers some compelling features. “UBports Foundation will be showcasing its work at the Canonical booth, the company behind Ubuntu. Canonical is planning to tell about the latest developments around the convergence of its devices and UBports Foundation will share its mission ‘Ubuntu On Every Device’ with the visitors,” UBports said in a February 8 press release. Currently, UBports’ website lists three devices as “fully working as daily drivers:” The OnePlus One, Nexus 5, and the Fairphone 2, with the latter showing all parts as functioning with Ubuntu Touch, save the GPS radio. (Interestingly, the UBports project website for the Fairphone 2 still lists the GSM radio [in addition to the GPS] as a work in progress. However there is a video of two people talking with the handset, so it’s likely the Fairphone 2 project website is out of date.) The website also has instructions for flashing Ubuntu to the Fairphone 2. Read more