Language Selection

English French German Italian Portuguese Spanish

Nine easy steps to installing Skype for Kubuntu Linux

Filed under
HowTos

A friend of mine, who is trying to rid his life of Microsoft Windows, has set himself the task of learning Linux.

I say ‘task’ because, for all it might be easy for those of us who’ve followed Linux’s evolution from a while back to think of something like installing a pre-compiled binary as fairly simple, to the uninitiated - things like adding repositories to the apt-get list - can sometimes be a minefield of in-speak readme files and esoteric, sleep inducing frustrating procedures - which even the self-confessed nerd can find obtuse and off-putting.

Here, then, is a walk through which, by example, uses Skype - the popular voice over IP client - but is a procedure by which most application installs follow, assuming there is a pre-built binary of the program you want to use available from the author(s).
Unlike Windows or Mac, you don’t necessarily have to go to the web-site of the software you want to install to download the application you want. In most cases you can find what you’re looking for by using what can simply be referred to as Linux’s “own” software pool, which is accessed by opening a program called Adept - which comes pre-installed with all current versions of Ubuntu and Kubuntu Linux - the most user friendly versions of Linux to date.

More Here.



More in Tux Machines

Leftovers: Gaming

Android Leftovers

Emulator now runs x86 apps on all Raspberry Pi models

Eltech’s faster ExaGear Desktop software version now supports ARMv6, in addition to ARMv7, letting users run x86 apps on all models of the Raspberry Pi. Russia-based Eltechs announced its ExaGear Desktop virtual machine last August, enabling Linux/ARMv7 SBCs and mini-PCs to run x86 software. That meant that users of the quad-core, Cortex-A7-based Raspberry Pi 2 Model B, could use it as well, although the software was not yet optimized for it. Read more

Maintaining an open source project at the Guardian

Over the 2015 Easter holiday the Scribe project received more than 3000 stars (a combination of bookmarking, liking and favouriting) on Github, making it easily one of the most popular open-source projects we have created at the Guardian. In addition to that milestone we also celebrated the release to our internal production systems of a number of community-contributed changes to Scribe. Guardian journalists now benefit every day from participation in the open-source community! Read more