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Tails Linux Users Warned Against Using the Tor Browser: Here's why!

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The developers of the security-focused portable Linux distro, Tails, have recently released an important advisory regarding its current release. They have warned users to avoid entering or using any personal or sensitive information while using Tor Browser on Tails 5.0 or older.

Tor Browser is the de-facto web browser used in Tails and helps protect the user’s identity online when connected to the Internet. It is mainly used by various journalists and activists to evade censorship. Everyday users can use it too.

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JavaScript strikes again

  • Critical Security Vulnerability Found in Firefox and Tor Browser [Ed: As usual, the issue is JavaScript, not the distro Tails or Tor]

    The Firefox browser and Tor browser bundle has been found to have a critical security vulnerability. Make sure firefox is updated to version 100.0.2 and Tor is updated to version 11.0.13

Tails OS Users Advised Not to Use Tor Browser Until Critical...

  • Tails OS Users Advised Not to Use Tor Browser Until Critical Firefox Bugs are Patched

    The maintainers of the Tails project have issued a warning that the Tor Browser that's bundled with the operating system is unsafe to use for accessing or entering sensitive information.

    "We recommend that you stop using Tails until the release of 5.1 (May 31) if you use Tor Browser for sensitive information (passwords, private messages, personal information, etc.)," the project said in an advisory issued this week.

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