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Devices With Linux and Other Free Systems

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Hardware
  • Embedded Linux development on Ubuntu – Part I | Ubuntu

    Throughout this series, we will discuss the key challenges of traditional software distribution mechanisms for embedded Linux devices. We will understand why legacy development and update approaches do not suit the Internet-of-Things (IoT) world and assess how Ubuntu simplifies and secures embedded Linux development.

    Although you don’t need prerequisite knowledge to follow this series, we recommend you have a basic understanding of the role played by Linux in the embedded portion of the compute spectrum. If you are new to the space and just getting started from scratch, get an intro to embedded Linux or delve into the official guide to Linux for embedded applications.

  • DepthVista combines RGB and 3D Time of Flight depth cameras

    Last week, e-con Systems launched the DepthVista camera which contains both an RGB and a Time of Flight (ToF) depth camera with a range of up to six meters. According to the company, the DepthVista can measure the distance from itself to a target object with an accuracy of < 1% depending on environmental conditions.

    The RGB camera integrated on the DepthVista is the AR0234CS CMOS digital image sensor (1/2.6-inch) from onsemi which is optimized for capturing high definition images for fast-moving objects. On the other hand, the 3D camera implemented seems to be the See3CAM_2TOF_5CUG from e-con itself.

  • Rockchip RK3588 CPU module exposes more I/Os through four board-to-board connectors - CNX Software

    We’ve already seen several Rockchip RK3588 modules with Firefly Core-3588J, Turing RK1, and Banana Pi RK3588_CV1, all with an edge connector to insertion into the carrier board. Rongpin RD-RK3588 system-on-module is a little different with four board-to-board connectors that enable a slightly more compact design, and should expose more I/Os than say a 314-pin MXM edge connector.

  • Meet Bittle, an Advanced Open-Source Robot Dog by Petoi - The DIY Life

    This is Bittle, a ready-to-run advanced open-source robot dog by Petoi that is based on the OpenCat robotic pet framework.

    If you’ve ever wanted to explore building your own robotic quadruped, but have felt overwhelmed by the amount of information and options available or have been at a loss with where to start, then Bittle is the perfect product for you. So in this review, we’ll take a look at what Bittle is, how it works and what it can be used for.

  • Remote indoor air quality monitoring with the Arduino Nicla Sense ME and Nano 33 IoT | Arduino Blog

    Most air quality-sensing devices integrate their sensors into the same enclosure as the display, which can make getting an accurate reading tough since the viewer is directly next to the unit and could potentially skew the values. This is why one element14 community member Enrique Albertos created his own portable air quality monitor that separates the sensing module from the screen.

    His system uses one Nicla Sense ME to gather air quality information about the surrounding environment with its onboard BME688 gas sensor. It is highly capable too, as it can quantify pressure, humidity, temperature, VOCs, VSCs, and various other harmful gases such as carbon monoxide. From here, the Nicla Sense ME sends its data over Bluetooth to an awaiting Nano 33 IoT board. The Nano is connected to a 1.8” TFT screen, which shows several pages of information that are cycled through by pressing one of the buttons at the bottom of the device.

DepthVista again

  • DepthVista USB 3D ToF camera supports close range depth measurement, far-range object detection

    DepthVista is a USB Time-of-Flight (ToF) camera designed for precise 3D depth measurement in close range mode (1.2m) and person and/or object detection in far-range mode up to 6 meters away.

    This ToF camera combines a 3D depth camera capable of 640 x 480 @ 30fps, and an Onsemi AR0234 color global shutter sensor supporting HD and FHD at up to 30fps, plus an 850nm VCSEL (vertical-cavity surface-emitting laser) for safety and the ability to operate in complete darkness.

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Raspberry Pi Zero Prints Giant Pictures with Thermal Receipt Printer

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Why I think the GNOME designers are incompetent

But GNOME folk didn't know how to do this. They don't know how to do window management properly at all. So they take away the title bar buttons, then they say nobody needs title bars, so they took away title bars and replaced them with pathetic "CSD" which means that action buttons are now above the text to which they are responses. Good move, lads. By the way, every written language ever goes from top to bottom, not the reverse. Some to L to R, some go R to L, some do both (boustrophedon) but they all go top to bottom.

The guys at Xerox PARC and Apple who invented the GUI knew this. The clowns at Red Hat don't.

There are a thousand little examples of this. They are trying to rework the desktop GUI without understanding how it works, and for those of us who do know how it works, and also know of alternative designs these fools have never seen, such as RISC OS, which are far more efficient and linear and effective, it's extremely annoying.

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