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Programming Leftovers

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  • Will Tauri become the next big thing to build desktop apps?

    Rust is a general-purpose statically-typed programming language that focuses on performance, safety, and concurrency. As it is popularity is growing, Rust community gained a proper attentive for Electron, which allows developers to build a desktop apps using web technologies, HTML, JavaScript, and JavaScript frameworks. So, here comes Tauri.

  • Python is getting faster: Major performance tweaks on horizon

    The next version of the standard Python interpreter, CPython, is expected in October. It will include significant performance improvements and support for running inside the browser.

    Last week, the first Python language summit since 2019 took place in Salt Lake City. At the event, the language's development team announced various changes for the forthcoming version of the language, as well as its near future. The Reg has covered some future improvements before, and as they get closer, details are becoming clear, as well as what's coming in Python 3.12.

    There are multiple editions of Python out there, including interpreters for the JVM and .NET CLR, as well as compilers, but the core implementation of the language is the CPython interpreter. This has some well-known limitations, including the Global Interpreter Lock or GIL, which prevents the language from taking full advantage of multicore processors.

  • 2022.20 439/468 – Rakudo Weekly News

    Anton Antonov reminded us that there is a cool Raku module in the ecosystem called Chemistry::Stoichiometry which allows you to do stochiometry: calculation of molecular masses for chemical compound formulas, and perhaps more interestingly doing chemical equations balancing! With support for many (natural) languages!

  • PiNote is not your traditional open-source code editor

    PiNote is a simple lightweight open-source code editor for Windows, Linux, and macOS. It is a small software package, written using Free Pascal and Lazarus IDE.

    PiNote supports multiple languages, macro, syntax highlighting, built-in file encryption and decryption, and more other features.

  • Google releases Flutter 3 with support for 6 platforms, wins praise from Xamarin co-founder [Ed: Microsoft's propagandist Tim Anderson now uses another publisher to boost other Microsoft moles]
  • OpenSSF, Linux Foundation Want to Replace C, C++ [Ed: Pushing Microsoft GitHub (NSA) in the name of "security" is a terrible idea and a shift towards proprietary software in the toolchain]

    The Open Source Security Foundation (OpenSSF) and the Linux Foundation released an action plan to improve open source software’s security and resilience. Part of that is eliminating non-memory-safe programming languages like C and C++.

    The action plan specifically proposes a $5.5 million investment to remove root causes of vulnerabilities by replacing non-memory-safe languages.

  • Status update, May 2022

    This was an exciting month: the Hare programming language is a secret no more! You can now try out the programming language I first teased over a year ago and tell me what you think. I hope you like it! I’m quite pleased with it so far.

    One thing Hare has done is allow me to unshelve several projects which were blocked pending the availability of a suitable language to write them in. I have actually been working on several of these for a while now — and several more are to come later — but I couldn’t share them thanks to Hare’s policy of secrecy early in its development. Allow me to introduce you to a few projects!

    Helios is a micro-kernel for x86_64, and ideally later for aarch64 and riscv64 as well (and possibly other targets as Hare grows additional ports). We have a few things working, such as paging and interrupts, and as of this morning we have entered userspace. Next up is rigging up syscalls and scheduling, then we’re going to start fleshing out an L4-inspired API and writing some drivers in userspace.

  • CudaText is an open-source code editor with minimal requirement

    CudaText is a cross-platform text editor, written in Object Pascal. It is open source project and can be used free of charge, even for business. It starts quite fast: ~0.3 sec with ~30 plugins, on Linux on CPU Intel Core i3 3GHz.

  • Daily Buggle | [bobulate]

    For FreeBSD things, there are four bug lists I keep track of; those are the “important bits” for me. It’s my bugs, and CMake bugs, and desktop bugs, and KDE bugs. Four lists, and sort-of-easy to query from FreeBSD’s bugzilla. I sometimes post to the socials a “daily buggle” of the counts of those lists. That started as a spoof of Wordle posts (I prefer Worldle myself) but has now grown to a tool of its own.

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today's howtos

  • How to install go1.19beta on Ubuntu 22.04 – NextGenTips

    In this tutorial, we are going to explore how to install go on Ubuntu 22.04 Golang is an open-source programming language that is easy to learn and use. It is built-in concurrency and has a robust standard library. It is reliable, builds fast, and efficient software that scales fast. Its concurrency mechanisms make it easy to write programs that get the most out of multicore and networked machines, while its novel-type systems enable flexible and modular program constructions. Go compiles quickly to machine code and has the convenience of garbage collection and the power of run-time reflection. In this guide, we are going to learn how to install golang 1.19beta on Ubuntu 22.04. Go 1.19beta1 is not yet released. There is so much work in progress with all the documentation.

  • molecule test: failed to connect to bus in systemd container - openQA bites

    Ansible Molecule is a project to help you test your ansible roles. I’m using molecule for automatically testing the ansible roles of geekoops.

  • How To Install MongoDB on AlmaLinux 9 - idroot

    In this tutorial, we will show you how to install MongoDB on AlmaLinux 9. For those of you who didn’t know, MongoDB is a high-performance, highly scalable document-oriented NoSQL database. Unlike in SQL databases where data is stored in rows and columns inside tables, in MongoDB, data is structured in JSON-like format inside records which are referred to as documents. The open-source attribute of MongoDB as a database software makes it an ideal candidate for almost any database-related project. This article assumes you have at least basic knowledge of Linux, know how to use the shell, and most importantly, you host your site on your own VPS. The installation is quite simple and assumes you are running in the root account, if not you may need to add ‘sudo‘ to the commands to get root privileges. I will show you the step-by-step installation of the MongoDB NoSQL database on AlmaLinux 9. You can follow the same instructions for CentOS and Rocky Linux.

  • An introduction (and how-to) to Plugin Loader for the Steam Deck. - Invidious
  • Self-host a Ghost Blog With Traefik

    Ghost is a very popular open-source content management system. Started as an alternative to WordPress and it went on to become an alternative to Substack by focusing on membership and newsletter. The creators of Ghost offer managed Pro hosting but it may not fit everyone's budget. Alternatively, you can self-host it on your own cloud servers. On Linux handbook, we already have a guide on deploying Ghost with Docker in a reverse proxy setup. Instead of Ngnix reverse proxy, you can also use another software called Traefik with Docker. It is a popular open-source cloud-native application proxy, API Gateway, Edge-router, and more. I use Traefik to secure my websites using an SSL certificate obtained from Let's Encrypt. Once deployed, Traefik can automatically manage your certificates and their renewals. In this tutorial, I'll share the necessary steps for deploying a Ghost blog with Docker and Traefik.

Red Hat Hires a Blind Software Engineer to Improve Accessibility on Linux Desktop

Accessibility on a Linux desktop is not one of the strongest points to highlight. However, GNOME, one of the best desktop environments, has managed to do better comparatively (I think). In a blog post by Christian Fredrik Schaller (Director for Desktop/Graphics, Red Hat), he mentions that they are making serious efforts to improve accessibility. Starting with Red Hat hiring Lukas Tyrychtr, who is a blind software engineer to lead the effort in improving Red Hat Enterprise Linux, and Fedora Workstation in terms of accessibility. Read more

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