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$26 Million for Gregory Kurtzer to Make 'Another' CentOS

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  • Software Infrastructure Leader CIQ Closes $26 Million Series A Led by Two Bear Capital
  • Rocky Linux developer CIQ raises $26M to recreate CentOS for enterprises | VentureBeat

    CIQ, a company that’s setting out to commercialize a new open-source Linux distribution and CentOS-successor called Rocky Linux, has raised $26 million in a series A round of funding.

    The raise comes a little more than a year after CIQ emerged from stealth (originally as “Ctrl IQ”), spearheaded by one of CentOS’s original creators, Gregory Kurtzer. Moreover, today’s news follows shortly after CIQ inked a major deal with Google to help support companies looking to deploy Rocky Linux on Google’s cloud infrastructure.

    While it’s still early days for CIQ, it seems things have gotten off to a solid start — the open-source Rocky Linux project is notching up as many as 250,000 downloads in some months, and its fresh cash injection could go some way toward helping it become one of the major Linux distributions for enterprises.

Rocky Linux sponsor CIQ secures $26m funding...

  • Rocky Linux sponsor CIQ secures $26m funding for CentOS successor

    CIQ, founding sponsor and services partner of Rocky Linux – a community build of Red Hat Enterprise Linux (RHEL) – is to receive a $26m injection of private funding led by Two Bear Capital.

    The announcement comes after Red Hat finally announced RHEL 9 this week, with general availability in the "coming weeks." The milestone is significant since Rocky Linux emerged in the wake of Red Hat's confirmation that it was dropping CentOS in favour of CentOS Stream as 2020 drew to a close.

    As we highlighted at the time, CentOS Stream is free community distribution but it is a development build that is only just slightly ahead of the production release of RHEL, which renders it unsuitable for live production usage.

By Microsoft booster

  • Rocky Linux developer lands $26m funding for enterprise open-source push

    CIQ has landed $26 million in funding to support its plans to expand the use of Rocky Linux in the enterprise space.

    Last year, Red Hat decided to stop supporting CentOS 8 and shifted focus to CentOS Stream. CentOS had some huge enterprise users, among them Disney, GoDaddy, RackSpace, Toyota, and Verizon.

    In response, Greg Kurtzer, one of CentOS's founders, kicked off Rocky Linux in December 2020. Seven months later, the Rocky Enterprise Software Foundation (RESF) released the first stable release of Rocky Linux 8.4.

In Slashdot this evening

CIQ raises $26M to promote free alternative to Red Hat Linux

  • CIQ raises $26M to promote free alternative to Red Hat Linux

    Ctrl IQ Inc., which does business as CIQ, said today it has raised a $26 million early-stage funding round to advance an alternative to Red Hat Inc.’s Enterprise Linux operating system.

    The Series A infusion brings the company’s total financing to $33 million and its valuation to $150 million, according to co-founder Gregory Kurtzer.

    CIQ is the founding sponsor and services partner behind Rocky Linux, an open-source and community-maintained enterprise Linux distribution based on CentOS, which is a fully compatible version of RHEL. CIQ Chief Executive Gregory Kurtzer was a founder of both CentOS and Rocky Linux.

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