Language Selection

English French German Italian Portuguese Spanish

Microsoft's personnel puzzle

Filed under
Microsoft

Sorkin, who holds a doctorate in computer science from the University of California, Los Angeles, said he first received an unsolicited invitation to Microsoft's Redmond, Wash., headquarters in about 2000, on the recommendation of a senior Microsoft manager.

But rather than attempt to win him over as a prize prospect--Sorkin specializes in operating system design and computer security, among other areas--Microsoft interviewers challenged him with a technical "pop quiz," he recalled. No one tried to sell him on either the company or the job, he said. He withdrew his application.

Then, during the past year, Microsoft called Sorkin to say it had scheduled a phone interview with him for another job. He hadn't applied for it, and no one had asked if he was interested.

"It displayed a certain degree of arrogance and presumption," Sorkin said. The approach also backfired: The consultant, who splits his time between Los Gatos, Calif., and Mesa, Ariz., didn't join the software maker.

Microsoft won't comment on Sorkin's claims. But he is one of many observers within and outside of Redmond who's raising questions about the way the company recruits and retains its work force. The issue has come to the fore in part because of comments made this month by internal Microsoft recruiter Gretchen Ledgard, who blasted some of her company's managers as "entitled, spoiled whiners" who assume that everyone wants to work for Microsoft.

Ledgard's comments also lifted the curtain on a broader debate about personnel practices at Microsoft, which now finds itself competing for talent with a host of new start-ups, and established rivals such as Google, IBM and Sony.

Among the charges leveled at Gates, Ballmer and crew: Job candidates have been turned off by Microsoft arrogance, and the company's extensive interview process works against hiring fresh thinkers.

Full Story.

More in Tux Machines

Review: Simplicity Linux 15.4 alpha

Overall I give it 2 Thumbs Up on speed and layout of OS. If you have a computer with low resources, then this is an OS for you to try. Read more

Eurostat continues to share and use open source

Eurostat, the statistical office of the European Communities, continues to release as open source its ICT solutions. To date, Eurostat has shared 102 solutions on the European Commission’s Joinup platform. The statistical office has been using and sharing open source for more than a decade. Already in 2004 Eurostat’s ICT policy stipulated to consider open source software for all new projects. Read more

Excellent: Android Ecosystem is Low-Margin, Fragmenting

What the figures really show is that Apple is price-gouging its customers, extracting unreasonable levels of profit by virtue of its monopoly. In the world of Android, by contrast, the fierce competition that exists between fungible manufacturers has driven down profit margins to razor-thin levels. Open source, and the level playing field that it creates, is a great way for maximising the benefits to customers, rather than companies. Read more

Open source empowers Sintra health centre

Open source tools used by ACES Sintra include content management system Wordpress, combined with the usual LAMP stack: the MySQL database management system, the Apache web server, Linux for the server host and the PHP web development scripting language. The combination is used for the public website, but also for several internal Intranet project and team sites. The organisation implements Wiki websites, mainly for the IT department but also to maintain a list of frequently asked questions and their answers. Read more