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SourceLabs Open-Source Catalog

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SourceLabs Inc., a service provider for open-source software, Wednesday announced a new community-based catalog of open-source projects that also serves as a wiki and features RSS technology.

Seattle-based SourceLabs introduced the new technology, called Swik, as a service to the open-source community, said Brad Silverberg, managing partner at venture capital firm Ignition Partners-which has invested in SourceLabs-and a SourceLabs board member.

"It's primarily for developers and end users to find out about all the different open-source projects, including documentation, download sites, reviews, descriptions, tips, tricks, all that kind of stuff," Silverberg said. But unlike other open-source catalog offerings, "there are a couple of things that are unique about it. First of all it's a wiki, so that anyone can edit, restructure or add comments-so it evolves dynamically as users use Swik.

"Another thing that's pretty cool about it is it's built using RSS technology, so that if you enter a project that's not already in its database it goes out and it automatically searches and builds information or an entry for that database from existing syndication feeds and populates that database," Silverberg said. "It's actually very cool. When you enter a project that it didn't already know about, it'll go out and search it and fill it in with a lot of the relevant information.

"And then if there's stuff you want to add to it, you can add to it yourself. And so it evolves dynamically as people use it, and it's a nice community resource. It ensures that it's always comprehensive, it's always useful and it's always up to date."

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