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Linux: Kernel Markers & 965GM Drivers

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Linux

In a series of ten patches, Mathieu Desnoyers posted an updated version of the Linux Kernel Markers. In the first patch he explains the need for markers:

"With the increasing complexity of today's user-space application and the wide deployment of SMP systems, the users need an increasing understanding of the behavior and performance of a system across multiple processes/different execution contexts/multiple CPUs. In applications such as large clusters (Google, IBM), video acquisition (Autodesk), embedded real-time systems (Wind River, Monta Vista, Sony) or sysadmin/programmer-type tasks (SystemTAP from Redhat), a tool that permits tracing of kernel-user space interaction becomes necessary."

Full Report.



Also:

Keith Packard announced the availability of drivers for Intel's 965GM Express Chipset. Jeff Garzik responded, "great news. Here's hoping that Intel produces a standalone video card eventually, to further take away market share from closed source competitors." In Keith's announcement he explained:

965GM Express Chipset Drivers.

Linux kernel development thoughts

One week ago, kernel hacker Ingo Molnar reviewed Con Kolivas' swap prefetch patches and approved them to be added to the official Linux kernel. Swap prefetching is a technique, which will load swapped out memory pages back in memory if the system is idle and memory has become available. This is useful for people starting temporary jobs which use a lot of memory, which makes other processes move to swap. Once the memory hungry process is finished, swap prefetching will kick in and slowly reload the swapped out pages back to memory, so that the system potentially does not need to do this anymore when the user again uses one of the swapped out processes. Tjos functionality can be enabled and disabled at will during compilation of the kernel.

Swap prefetching has been available for a long time in Con Kolivas patch set, and was also added to the mm development kernels some time ago. In that period, no bugs have been reported, and it seems people are happy with this feature. So it was hoped that the push by Ingo Molnar, would finally make swap prefetching available for all Linux users in version 2.6.22.

That Full Post @ Frederik's Blog.

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