Language Selection

English French German Italian Portuguese Spanish

One fifth of Japanese businesses using open source OS

Filed under
OSS

The use of open-source operating systems in enterprise servers is growing in Japan, with companies citing low introduction costs as the main factor for adoption, according to a recent report by the Japanese government.

So far, 21 percent of Japanese companies have already introduced open-source operating systems including Linux, FreeBSD and OpenBSD systems, while 22 percent either have plans to deploy, or are considering plans to deploy, an open-source operating system, according to an annual white paper released by Japan's Ministry of Internal Affairs and Communications (MIC).

By contrast, 33 percent of U.S. companies have adopted open-source operating systems in at least some of their servers, MIC said.

Among the companies polled by the MIC, 66 percent said open-source operating systems have low initial costs, while 47.8 percent said the software has low operating costs

Of those companies that have so far adopted open-source operating systems, major uses for these servers include Web, mail, and file servers. Open-source operating systems are used with much less frequency in applications for financial, payment, distribution and customer service applications, the report said.

While many Japanese companies are planning to use open-source operating systems, 22 percent of companies said they were interested in, but not considering introducing open-source operating systems, while 20 percent said they were not going to adopt open source, the report said.

The MIC white paper did not provide data on the number of companies that responded to the ministry's survey, which was conducted on the Web.

By Paul Kallender
IDG News Service

More in Tux Machines

What containers and unikernels can learn from Arduino and Raspberry Pi

There is a lot of interesting buzz around specialized container hosts, rump kernels, and unikernels because they hold the potential to revolutionize certain workloads (embedded, cloud, etc.). Keep your eye on this exciting, fast moving space, but cautiously. Currently, unikernels seem quite similar to building printed circuits. They require a lot of upfront investment to utilize and are very specialized, providing benefits for certain workloads. In the meantime containers are quite interesting even for conventional workloads and don't require as much investment. Typically an operations team should be able to port an application to containers, whereas it takes real re-engineering to port an application to unikernels and the industry is still not quite sure what workloads can be ported to unikernels. Here's to an exciting future of containers, rump kernels, and unikernels! Read more

5 open source skills in high demand

The open source job market is booming and companies need talent to drive their business. Here are the five most in-demand skills for open source IT professionals. Read more

Red Hat and Fedora

Kernel Space: Linux, Graphics