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Raspberry Pi Leftovers

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Hardware
  • Multilingual blink for Raspberry Pi Pico - Raspberry Pi

    A year ago today we launched our Raspberry Pi Pico board, the first product powered by the RP2040 microcontroller, a brand-new chip developed right here at Raspberry Pi. A year later we’ve sold nearly 1.5 million Picos, and thousands of you have used RP2040 in your own electronic projects and products.

  • Hackaday Links: January 23, 2022

    Sandy Macdonald from York quickly cobbled together a Raspberry Pi and a pressure/humidity sensor board and added a little code to create a recording barometer.

  • Display Your Speech In Realtime To Help Lipreaders In The Mask Era

    The system consists of a small screen that can be worn on the chest or other part of the body, and a lapel microphone to record the wearer’s speech. Using the Deepgram AI speech recognition API running on a Raspberry Pi Zero W, the system decodes the speech and displays it on the Hyperpixel screen.

StackyPi – A Raspberry Pi RP2040 board with Raspberry Pi Zero

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today's howtos

  • Force Users To Use Strong Passwords In Debian And Ubuntu - OSTechNix

    This brief tutorial explains how to force users to use strong passwords using Pluggable Authentication Modules (PAM) in Debian, Ubuntu and other DEB-based systems.

  • How to Get the MAC Address of a Network Interface Card - TREND OCEANS

    You are about to learn what a MAC address is, where they are stored, how they are assigned, the relationship between MAC addresses and IP addresses, and finally, how to get the MAC address of a network interface card.

  • How To Install KTorrent on Ubuntu 22.04 LTS - idroot

    In this tutorial, we will show you how to install KTorrent on Ubuntu 22.04 LTS. For those of you who didn’t know, KTorrent is a full-featured BitTorrent application that allows you to download files using the BitTorrent protocol. Also enables you to run multiple torrents at the same time and comes with extended features to make it a full-featured client for BitTorrent. KTorrent is available on Windows, macOS, and Linux operating systems. This article assumes you have at least basic knowledge of Linux, know how to use the shell, and most importantly, you host your site on your own VPS. The installation is quite simple and assumes you are running in the root account, if not you may need to add ‘sudo‘ to the commands to get root privileges. I will show you the step-by-step installation of the KTorrent torrent client on Ubuntu 22.04 (Jammy Jellyfish). You can follow the same instructions for Ubuntu 22.04 and any other Debian-based distribution like Linux Mint, Elementary OS, Pop!_OS, and more as well.

  • Ryan Kavanagh's /dev/brain

    I’ve been using OpenIKED for some time now to configure my VPN. One of its features is that it can dynamically assign addresses on the internal network to clients, and clients can assign these addresses and routes to interfaces. However, these interfaces must exist before iked can start. Some months ago I switched my Debian laptop’s configuration from the traditional ifupdown to systemd-networkd. It took me some time to figure out how to have systemd-networkd create dummy interfaces on which iked can install addresses, but also not interfere with iked by trying to manage these interfaces. Here is my working configuration.

EasyOS Dunfell-series 4.2

EasyOS was created in 2017, derived from Quirky Linux, which in turn was derived from Puppy Linux in 2013. Easy is built in woofQ, which takes as input binary packages from any distribution, and uses them on top of the unique EasyOS infrastructure. Throughout 2020, the official release for x86_64 PCs was the Buster-series, built with Debian 10.x Buster DEBs. EasyOS has also been built with packages compiled from source, using a fork of OpenEmbedded (OE). Currently, the Dunfell release of OE has been used, to compile two sets of binary packages, for x86_64 and aarch64. The latter have been used to build EasyOS for the Raspberry Pi4, and first official release, 2.6.1, was in January 2021. The page that you are reading now has the release notes for EasyOS Dunfell-series on x86_64 PCs, also debuting in 2021. Ongoing development is now focused on the x86_64 Dunfell-series. The last version in the x86_64 Buster-series is 2.6.2, on June 29, 2021, and that is likely to be the end of that series. Releases for the Pi4 Dunfell-series are still planned but very intermittent. The version number is for EasyOS itself, independent of the target hardware; that is, the infrastructure, support-glue, system scripts and system management and configuration applications. The latest version is becoming mature, though Easy is an experimental distribution and some parts are under development and are still considered as beta-quality. However, you will find this distro to be a very pleasant surprise, or so we hope. Read more Also: EasyOS Dunfell-series version 4.2 released

today's leftovers

  • Learn C++ Programming Step by Step – A 20 Day Curriculum!

    Although there are numerous programming languages available in the market to work upon, but C++ has never lost its charm since its inception and still has a strong impact in the development world. As per the reports, C++ comes under a few top programming languages across the world. Alike the C programming language, C++ also makes it easier for you to understand the underlying architecture of programming, although it also supports other additional features such as object-oriented programming, exception handling, etc. Moreover, various IT giants Google, Amazon, Microsoft, etc. offer numerous career opportunities to C++ professionals, hence you’re strongly recommended to give it a try and start to learn C++ Programming.

  • Security by Diversity: Designing Secure, Reliable and Robust Systems

    This is the first in a series of blog posts on Security by Diversity. Here we'll focus on the scaling properties of reliability through diversity. Later blog posts will introduce the business and economic aspects of security through diversity and discuss not only technical security but also how to secure coordination and similar organisational aspects.

  • Firmware updates, part 2: Transporting the update

    This is the second post in a series about doing device firmware updates (DFU) over the air (OTA) and continuous deployment of firmware for embedded devices. We'll explore the different parts of a complete end-to-end system with this capability.

    This post will be about the different networks and how you can manage firmware updates using them.

  • A mystery with Fedora 36, fontconfig, and xterm (and urxvt)

    As of Fedora 36, Fedora changed their default fonts from DejaVu to Noto. This changes what the standard names 'serif', 'sans', and especially 'monospace'. When I upgraded my desktops to Fedora 36, I had a very bad reaction to the 'monospace' change, because the result looks really bad. It turns out that part of the reason that the result looks bad (although not all of it) is specific to xterm, and that is where the mystery comes in.

  • App Rules Are Twisted to Absurdity

    Apple and Google have twisted their decade-old rules for their app stores like a pretzel to the point where they may no longer make sense. This has made buying digital stuff in apps convoluted as heck.

    One example: In theory, although not yet in reality, you can use your Amazon account to buy an e-book from Kindle’s iPhone app. You cannot buy an e-book in the Android version of the app. Until recently, Kindle purchases were effectively a no-go under Apple’s rules but fine under Google’s. Now it’s the opposite.

    Confusing? Yep. Apple and Google have written long, complicated guidelines for apps and have frequently revised those rules to protect their own interests. (I’ve noted before that Apple’s app rules are much longer than the United States Constitution.)

today's howtos

  • Fallocate Command in Linux with 5 Examples

    When you create a new file on your Linux computer, a certain amount of disk space is allocated to the file. Adding new content to this file increases the file size and accordingly, Linux allocates more space to the file. Alternatively, you can use the fallocate command in Linux to preallocate data blocks, which involves allocating the data blocks and marking these data blocks as uninitialized.

  • Linux: ZIP Files and Directories (How To Tutorial) - Linux Stans

    In this tutorial, we’re going to show you how to zip files and directories/folders on Linux. This tutorial will work on most major distros, like Ubuntu, Linux Mint, Fedora, Debian, CentOS, etc. ZIP is a utility used to compress/archive files and directories on Linux. It’s available for most major distros. This tutorial is for the CLI/terminal. All you need is access to the command line and the root/sudo user. If you want to zip/compress something via the GUI (graphical user interface), then just right-click on the files or folders and click on Compress or Archive.

  • How to Install MySQL Community on Debian 11 Bullseye - LinuxCapable

    MySQL is a relational database management system based on SQL (Structured Query Language). It is one of the most widely used database software for several well-known applications. MySQL is used for data warehousing, e-commerce, and logging applications, but its most used feature is a web database storage and management. The following tutorial will teach you how to install MySQL Community on Debian 11 Bullseye using the MySQL official APT repository, which will give you the latest version available on your system using the command line terminal.

  • Install Rocket Chat server on Ubuntu 22.04 using Snap - Linux Shout

    Learn a simple command to install Rocket Chat Server on Ubuntu 22.04 LTS Jammy JellyFish using the command terminal. Rocket.Chat is an open-source platform for team collaboration and communication with live chat, video and audio conferences, file sharing, message translation, and more. With Rocket.Chat, users can use the native iOS apps and Android apps from any device with Internet access, including Windows, Mac, mobile devices, or tablet devices. People widely compare it with Slack and consider it one of the Best Alternatives of it. With the communication platform, employees in the company can chat, exchange files and meet in group chats. This saves mass e-mails to many addressees, as everyone can read along in the group chat and trace the communication. In addition, there is security through end-to-end encryption to keep communication confidential. In addition to pure text messages, video calls are also possible. Facebook, WhatsApp, SMS, and CRM can also be integrated into Rocket.Chat. From the Advanced package, the Rocket chat app even includes video conferencing and helpdesk chat. Users can go their business with the helpdesk chat for customer inquiries on their homepage with the help of omnichannel.

  • How to Install Sysdig on Debian 11 Bullseye - LinuxCapable

    Sysdig is open source, system-level exploration: capture system state and activity from a running Linux-based system such as Debian 11, then save, filter, and analyze that is particularly useful for system analysis, inspection, and debugging, amongst other uses. Sysdig is scriptable in Lua and includes a command-line interface and a powerful interactive UI using the command csysdig that runs in your terminal. The following tutorial will teach you how to install Sysdig on Debian 11 Bullseye using the command line terminal and basic commands for using Sysdig.