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Linux 5.17-rc1

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Linux

I've tagged the rc1 release a couple of hours earlier than usual, and
in a timezone 10 hours before the usual one, so this merge window was
technically a bit shorter than usual. But if somebody didn't get their
pull request in in time, they shouldn't have left it so late - and
there's always 5.18. Never fear - we'll not run out of numbers.

I was nervous that this merge window would be more painful than usual
due to my family-related travels, but I have to give thanks to people:
a lot of you sent your pull requests early in the merge window, and
while there were a couple of hiccups I hit early on, that was all
before switching my main workstation to a laptop. Everything seems to
have gone fairly smoothly.

Knock wood.

5.17 doesn't seem to be slated to be a huge release, and everything
looks fairly normal. We've got a bit more activity than usual in a
couple of corners of the kernel (random number generator and the
fscache rewrite stand out), but even with those things, the big
picture view looks very much normal: the bulk is various driver
updates, with architectures updates, documentation, and tooling being
the bulk of the rest. Even with a total rewrite, that fscache diff
looks more like a blip in the big picture.

And hey, it may not be a huge release, but the full shortlog would
still be much too big to post - or scan through. So as is traditional,
I'm just appending my mergelog as a highlevel view of what's been
going on.

Please give it all a test,

                  Linus

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Also: Linux 5.17-rc1 Released A Little Bit Early But With Shiny New Features

Kernel prepatch 5.17-rc1

  • Kernel prepatch 5.17-rc1

    The first 5.17 kernel prepatch is out for testing, and the merge window is closed for this release.

Latest clickbait garbage from Simon Sharwood

  • Desktop-deprived Linus Torvalds releases first release candidate of ‘not huge’ kernel 5.17

    The first release candidate for version 5.17 of the Linux kernel has rolled off the production line – despite fears that working from a laptop might complicate matters.

    Emperor Penguin Linus Torvalds is currently on the road and, when announcing the release of Linux 5.16 predicted that the version 5.17 release merge window would be “somewhat painful” due to his travels, and use of a laptop – something Torvalds said “I generally try to avoid.”

    Torvalds’ laptop aversion comes from the fact that he likes to do lots of local testing on his beastly workstation powered by a 32-core AMD Ryzen Threadripper. Linus’ lappie appears not to match his desktop, so he ends up using more automated build testing in the cloud.

    “And so [i] really hope that everything has been properly cooking in linux-next so that there are no unnecessary issues that pop up when things hit my tree,” he wrote.

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