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C3 Show Sees Search for Simple Security

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Security

Chasing down viruses and building better spam filters are worthwhile pursuits. But computer security vendors can also make a mark for themselves by figuring out ways of taking more of the hands-on security burden off of customers' shoulders, according to attendees at this week's C3 Expo in New York City.

To be clear, C3 Expo (Corporate and Channel Computing Expo), a trade show that made its debut at the end of June, is not a security conference. The first-year crowd at Manhattan's Javits Center consisted mainly of IT managers, VARs and business users, as opposed to security professionals.

Yet security was a topic that just about everyone seemed to be thinking and talking about, regardless.

Here's one type of comment heard often at the show: Computer security is a complex discipline, and one which is changing so fast that it's hard for many IT administrators to keep up to speed, let alone consumers and office users.

David Hooley, a corporate buyer for ACI Systems Inc., got down to brass tacks.

"What's the main security problem today? It's end users who don't know enough about security. For instance, they'll give away their passwords to just about anybody who wants to know," he said.

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