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Kernel: Linux 5.17 Changes, Best of 2021, and More

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Linux
  • Linux 5.17 Picks Up A Real-Time Analysis Tool - Phoronix

    A new tool added to the kernel source tree with Linux 5.17 is rtla to serve for real-time Linux performance and tracing analysis.

    Thanks to the work of kernel developer Daniel Bristot de Oliveira who is employed by Red Hat, the Real-Time Linux Analysis (RTLA) tool has been added to the kernel source tree.

    RTLA makes use of the Linux kernel's tracing capabilities to help analyze performance and tracing data. In particular, the rtla command has sub-options for reading information from the kernel's operating system noise "osnoise" and IRQ/thread timer latency "timerlat"tracers.

  • Some Tablets/Convertibles With Linux 5.17 Will Now Have Working Pen Support - Phoronix

    In addition to Linux 5.17 introducing Universal Stylus Initiative (USI) support for that new industry standard for styluses/pens that can work cross-device, the input subsystem updates for this kernel also add active pen support for a few more tablets.

    Moving forward hopefully we will see broad adoption of USI stylus support for nice cross-device compatibility and support. But for those with current tablets relying on Goodix or Silead drivers and have an active pen, the Linux 5.17 input subsystem updates present working pen support there with their respective devices.

  • Lenovo USB-C 7-in-1 Hub On Linux Review - Phoronix

    For those considering the Lenovo USB-C 7-in-1 Hub for connecting to your Lenovo laptop for enjoying USB-C power charging, HDMI output, and additional USB ports, it does work out on Linux. While there have been some users running into seemingly firmware-related issues, at least with my testing over the past month this $50~60 (USD) USB-C hub has been working out well under Linux.

  • Best of 2021 – Torvalds’ Bug Warning is a Lesson for Linux Users

    A recent, widely publicized case illustrated this point; Linux creator himself, Linus Torvalds, warned against the use of the Linux 5.12 release. He described a “nasty bug,” and wrote that the situation is a “mess,” due to the use of swap files when adding Linux updates. This nasty bug, in fact, had the potential to destroy entire root directories.

  • Epoch-alypse now: BBC iPlayer flaunts 2038 cutoff date • The Register

    Feeling old yet? Let the Reg ruin your day for you. We are now substantially closer to the 2038 problem (5,849 days) than it has been since the Year 2000 problem (yep, 8,049 days since Y2K).

    Why do we mention it? Well, thanks to keen-eyed Reg reader Calum Morrison, we've spotted a bit of the former, and a hint of what lies beneath the Beeb's digital presence, when he sent in a snapshot that implies Old Auntie might be using a 32-bit Linux in iPlayer, and something with a kernel older than Linux 5.10, too.

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