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Tories plan open door for open source

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OSS

A Tory strategy to make more use of open source software in the public sector is likely to tackle the culture of secrecy in government procurement, according to early details released to The Register.

Planned for publication next month and stemming from shadow chancellor George Osborne's adoption of a West Coast attitude, the plans are also likely to encourage the adoption of open standards and promote an indigenous open source industry.

The Conservatives, on the other hand, think their open market philosophy can be tied up with the open source model and the principle of open government in one great big plan to revitalise the British software industry, society, and politics.

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