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LibreOffice: The Klingons and Interslavs are already here

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We happily report that Klingons have – at this point – not taken over control of the LibreOffice bug-tracker.

While Klingon language support still ranks somewhat low among issues thought not to be essential, the federation that is LibreOffice 7.3 will also bring Interslavic support to the mix when released come early February.

Since you were wondering, Interslavic is an artificial language meant to operate in the cross-section of Slavic interlingualism.

Targ-herders everywhere are reportedly mildly pleased. The synergy in KSL (Klingon as second language) regions is a potato harvest that we can all appreciate.

Undeterred by the confines of a monogalactic community of translators, LibreOffice numbers are growing. Hundreds of millions or earthlings alone now have powerful tools honed in their native languages.

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'IwlIj jachjaj! Incoming LibreOffice 7.3 to support Klingon..

  • 'IwlIj jachjaj! Incoming LibreOffice 7.3 to support Klingon and Interslavic

    There's a good chance you've heard of LibreOffice – OK, yes, and Klingon. Interslavic, maybe not. Here's why some of you should care.

    LibreOffice is the continuation of the moribund OpenOffice project, which had to change its name because Oracle claimed the trademark on the old name.

    If you're still using OpenOffice, don't. It's basically dead. Download LibreOffice, uninstall OpenOffice, then install LibreOffice instead. It's completely compatible because it's the same program, just a more modern version – smaller, faster, less buggy, and more secure.

    It's even handy if you have a legit copy of Microsoft Office. In your correspondent's experience, it's a lot better at recovering corrupted or damaged MS Office files than MS Office itself. (It's also free, resistant to MS Office viruses, and legal even for commercial use.)

    And as for the languages? The website already lists 51, and more are coming. That's a tiny fraction of the world's 7,000-plus languages, and a language goes extinct every two weeks. For small communities trying to keep minority languages alive, being able to write in it is very important.

Open-source software LibreOffice to add Star Trek's Klingon lang

  • Open-source software LibreOffice to add Star Trek's Klingon language to 7.3 update

    Beginning in February, open source writing platform LibreOffice 7.3 promises to include support for two “made up” languages: Interslavic and Klingon.

    According to a report from neowin.com, the decision to include the Klingon and Interslavic languages is an effort to streamline user workload by allowing users to work with the languages without the need to use alternative translation. The Klingon language was developed for the Star Trek franchise by linguist Marc Orkrand. Interslavic, on the other hand, is meant to “bridge the language gap between Slavic languages such as Russian and Polish.”

LibreOffice 7.3 will ship with support for two made-up languages

  • LibreOffice 7.3 will ship with support for two made-up languages; Klingon and Interslavic

    The popular open-source office suite, LibreOffice, will support two constructed (made-up) languages from early February with the launch of LibreOffice 7.3. The two languages are Star Trek’s Klingon – the language of the Klingons, and Interslavic, a language that's supposed to bridge the language gap between Slavic languages such as Russian and Polish.

    With LibreOffice mainly being funded by donations, some of its benefactors will be no doubt wondering if their money isn’t being wasted on the implementation of these languages due to the fact that they have a tiny number of speakers. In response to this concern, The Document Foundation (which runs LibreOffice) said that it’s important to remember the community develops the suite so individual contributors can work on items that are important to them, therefore, an individual working on a Klingon translation doesn't stop the wider project from working on other important tasks.

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