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$399 PinePhone Pro Explorer Edition Linux Smartphone will go on sale within weeks

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Gadgets

The PinePhone Pro began shipping to developers earlier this month. And soon it’ll be available for anyone to purchase.

Pine64 has announced that it will begin taking orders for the $399 Linux-friendly smartphone in late December or early January.

First announced in October, the PinePhone Pro is a smartphone with a 6 inch HD+ display, a Rockchip RK3399S hexa-core processor, 4GB of RAM, 128GB of storage. While those specs put the phone in mid-range territory, they aren’t the things that make the PinePhone Pro stand out.

Pine64’s new smartphone has a few features that seem like throwbacks in 2021… but in a good way. It has a removable 3,000 mAh battery, a headset jack, and a microSD card reader. The phone also has physical switches that allow you to disable hardware including the cameras, mic, headphones, and wireless features if you want privacy.

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PineNote Developer Edition mainline Linux e-Reader

  • PineNote Developer Edition mainline Linux e-Reader is now available for $399

    Pine64 community has been on a tear in 2022, with the launch of the PineNote Developer Edition Linux e-reader following the availability of the PinePhone keyboard case and PinePhone Pro Explorer Edition Linux smartphone in the last 2-3 weeks.

    So far a limited number of PineNote prototypes had been sent to developers, but it’s now possible to order the PineNote Developer Edition for $399 directly on the Pine64 store. As its name implies, the e-Reader is not ready for end-users, but recent progress with mainline Linux makes it suitable for developers and enthusiasts who want to play around with the device knowing much more work is needed to make it a usable device.

PineNote: Linux-based eReader with a digitizer from PINE64

  • PineNote: Linux-based eReader with a digitizer from PINE64 is now available for US$399

    The PineNote is orderable, some five months after the eReader debuted. To recap, the PineNote has a 10.1-inch e-ink display with a 1,872 x 1,404-pixel resolution. The eReader also has a digitizer that supports Wacom EMR-compatible pens, along with 128 GB of eMMC flash storage and 4 GB of LPDDR4 RAM.

    Additionally, the PineNote has a 4,000 mAh battery, a Rockchip RK3566 SoC, a USB Type-C port and a Wi-Fi 5-capable modem. PINE64 adds that the eReader has 1.3 W stereo speakers too, plus four microphones and a gyroscope for sensing when to rotate the device's display.

The PinePhone Pro brings upgraded hardware to the Linux phone

  • The PinePhone Pro brings upgraded hardware to the Linux phone

    Pine64 is launching a major hardware upgrade in its quest to build a Linux smartphone. After the launch of the original PinePhone in 2019, the organization is now taking preorders for the PinePhone Pro, a new smartphone it's calling "the fastest mainline Linux smartphone on the market." The phone was announced in October, and you can now secure a unit. The MSRP is $599, but it's up for preorder now at an introductory price of $399.

    Since Pine64 wants to make an open source Linux smartphone, its choice of hardware components is limited. Most big chip companies like Qualcomm or Samsung don't want to share open drivers or schematics, and you saw that with the original PinePhone, which was based on a 40 nm Cortex A53 SoC made by Allwinner. The PinePhone Pro is upgrading things with a Rockchip RK3399 SoC. The chip sports two Cortex A72 CPUs and four Cortex A53 CPUs, and Pine64 says it worked with Rockchip to get the chip "binned and voltage locked for optimal performance with sustainable power and thermal limits." Pine64 doesn't cite a process node, but other companies list the RK3399 at 28 nm. If that's true and you're looking for something roughly comparable in Qualcomm's lineup, the Snapdragon 618/650 (a mid-range chip from 2016) would seem to fit the bill.

The PinePhone Pro could be the first Linux-based smartphone

  • The PinePhone Pro could be the first Linux-based smartphone worth a look

    Pine64 is now accepting preorders for the PinePhone Pro, billed as the “fastest mainline Linux smartphone on the market”.

    Successor to the original PinePhone from 2019, the PinePhone Pro is designed to fill a gap in the market for a Linux-based smartphone with sufficient raw power to compete with iOS and Android alternatives.

    The device is also set apart by its swappable backplate, under which is found a removable battery, SD card slot and privacy switches that let the user cut access to the cameras, microphone, Wi-Fi and more.

Experimental PineNote E-Reader Now Available for $399

  • Experimental PineNote E-Reader Now Available for $399

    The 10.3-inch PineNote e-reader is now available to buy, but this isn't a device ready to compete with the Kindle just yet.

    Last year, Pine64 announced it was developing an e-reader that runs Linux called the PineNote. As Liliputing reports, an experimental version of the PineNote has now gone on sale for $399, but it's called "experimental" and the Developer Edition for a good reason.

    A note on the PineNote product page states, "The PineNote is an experimental device. PineNote software is still in it’s infancy and therefore it is ONLY suitable for experienced developers. At present time, there is no default OS for the PineNote."

PineNote E Ink tablet now on sale for all even as developers...

  • PineNote E Ink tablet now on sale for all even as developers continue refining the product

    The PineNote tablet is now on sale, which means anyone having $399 to spare, can order the E Ink tablet right away. The company known for its PinePhone and PineBook devices had put on sale limited quantities of the PineNote device in December though that was limited to the developers only. However, the e-note is now available for all to buy, and barring the Chinese New Year celebrations in February, there isn’t likely to be any disruption in supplies in the foreseeable future, the company revealed via its Jan. 2022 update.

    That said, the PineNote is still very much a work-in-progress thing so that the device right now is shipping without any operating system installed. There is going to be just the bootloader, which means buyers have the liberty to install the OS of their choice. Here again, there aren’t very many options as well though developers have been able to run the Alpine and Debian Linux to run on the tablet. A NixOS port too is being readied and should be available sometime soon.

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