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Scaredy Cats’ Introduction to Linux

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Linux

There are compelling reasons for Windows users to switch to (or at least evaluate) Linux, but when you know no other world than Windows or don’t want to even think about partitioning your precious hard drive, it can be one heck of a leap of faith! As a Windows user wanting to try Linux but scared of losing the world as I knew it, I found a risk-free method of trying Linux without threatening the installation of Windows safely installed on my PC.

Mandriva Move and Knoppix are two different flavours of Linux that reside entirely on a bootable LiveCD. Mandriva Move or Knoppix are not installed on your hard drive, they actually run from the CD without touching or threatening your Windows operating system in any way. This allows scaredy cats like me to experiment with Linux until my heart is content, then eject the CD and return to my Windows safety blanket just as I left it.

To give this scaredy cats introduction to Linux a go, you need to:

  • Download Mandriva Move or Knoppix (about 700MB);
  • Burn it to CD; and

  • Try it

Firstly, the download is a single file with a .iso extension. Copies of the ISOs are downloaded from public FTP mirrors, which also offer you the option of using BitTorrent if that takes your fancy. Once you have your .iso file you need to burn it to a CD. Finally, the magical moment for trying Linux. With your freshly-burnt CD inserted, shutdown / restart your PC. There is only one way to go from this point, and that is to answer set-up questions, follow your nose, and don’t be afraid to try.

Full Story.

yeahbutt

While Knoppix is the mother of live cd's, it really gives a poor representation of what Linux can be. PCLinuxOS is a stunning and immediately useful distro upon first boot. Everything to include website streaming works without any tweaking. I found that the poor font presentation in Knoppix and Mandriva's constant cajoling for membership fee's to be equally tiring. I do appreciate the authors intent and superb presentation. I simply believe that PCLinuxOS is the best tool available for introducing the new Linux User to our world.

re: yeahbutt

Yeah, I tried to leave a similar comment on the original story site, but I don't think it got published. Tongue

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You talk the talk, but do you waddle the waddle?

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