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SCO wanted gag order for Linus Torvalds, Groklaw in 2004

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Legal

According to a recently uncovered filing in the long-running SCO v. IBM case, SCO tried to have Groklaw—along with a handful of people associated with the open-source movement, like Linus Torvalds—silenced back in 2004. In a letter sent to IBM, dated February 11, 2004, one of SCO's attorneys said that the company "had been told that IBM is a sponsor of Groklaw."

SCO suggested that all parties involved in the litigation be subject to a stipulated gag order. The company then stretched the definition of "involved parties" to include SCO, Columbia Law professor Eben Moglen, OSS advocate Eric Raymond, and Linus Torvalds. "Because of Mr. Torvalds' position in the technology world, his comments about SCO's evidence in this case are given particular weight in industry and popular press," argues the letter from SCO attorney Kevin P. McBride.

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This sickens me

Attempts to silence us, particularly Groklaw folks, is appalling. As PJ says, it's almost as though the US press has devolved into the state of Russian/Malaysian cases of censorship, gagging, and intimidation. It's terrible. Back in the days of paid astroturfing against OS/2, people even received death threats.

re: sickens me

Silencing Groklaw

Yes, SCO and their lawyers made an attempt to obliterate our first amendment speech rights in the U.S.A.

Pamela Jones (PJ) did something with Groklaw that few other journalists have done. She actually (and quite legally) published all the court documents regarding the SCO vs IBM and SCO vs Novell/SUSE cases, along with her commentary, and the commentary and discussions of others. When I first saw Groklaw publish the court source material ("Use the force source, Luke--use the source!"), I knew they were the real deal.

PJ also published volumes of material on understanding legal procedures and legal jargon. She helped educate her readership.

SCO, in it's bogus claims of ownership of Unix, AIX, and Linux IP is going down big time, as they deserve to do.

These are crazy times in the U.S.A. where a company, like SCO, actually has the nerve to try to limit citizens' free speech rights. It sickens me too.

Yes, she's a trailblazer in

Yes, she's a trailblazer in legal blogging, and I am fortunate to be close to her.

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