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Ubuntu-based Freespire 8.0 Linux distribution focuses heavily on Google services

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Linux
Ubuntu

Guess what, folks? Freespire 8.0 is available to download immediately. This version of the Ubuntu-based operating system utilizes Linux kernel 5.4.0-91 LTS while using Xfce 4.16 as its desktop environment. This no-nonsense distribution is fairly lightweight and easy to use, making it a good choice for Linux newbies; particularly with aging (not obsolete) hardware.

Surprisingly, the developers have decided to focus heavily on Google with this release. This includes the search giant's services (Translate, News, etc.) and the Chrome browser. Apparently, this new focus is a result of reading user feedback. While this may scare some privacy-zealots away, it should make the operating system more appealing to the average home computer user. Let's be honest, shall we? Google services are rather essential for many people.

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By Brian Fagioli

  • Ubuntu-based Freespire 8.0 Linux distribution focuses heavily on Google services

    Guess what, folks? Freespire 8.0 is available to download immediately. This version of the Ubuntu-based operating system utilizes Linux kernel 5.4.0-91 LTS while using Xfce 4.16 as its desktop environment. This no-nonsense distribution is fairly lightweight and easy to use, making it a good choice for Linux newbies; particularly with aging (not obsolete) hardware.

    Surprisingly, the developers have decided to focus heavily on Google with this release. This includes the search giant's services (Translate, News, etc.) and the Chrome browser. Apparently, this new focus is a result of reading user feedback. While this may scare some privacy-zealots away, it should make the operating system more appealing to the average home computer user. Let's be honest, shall we? Google services are rather essential for many people.

Freespire 8.0 Comes Tightly Integrated with Google Services

  • Freespire 8.0 Comes Tightly Integrated with Google Services

    The developers behind Freespire 8.0 have decided to put strong focus and take full advantage on Google’s services with this release.

    For those of you unfamiliar with what Freespire is, let’s start with some history. Freespire started off under the name Lindows twenty years ago as an easy-to-use Linux-based operating system with great Wine integration and easy application support, but then changed to Linspire following a Microsoft lawsuit.

    Nowadays, Freespire is a desktop oriented Ubuntu-based Linux distro powered by Xfce. It’s the open source equivalent of Linspire, but containing mostly FOSS components.

    Freespire is sponsored by Linspire, a commercial, desktop-oriented Linux distrio based on Debian and Ubuntu and owned by PC/OpenSystems LLC.

    A couple of days ago the Freespire development team announced the release of Freespire 8.0, so let’s take a brief look at it.

Freespire 8.0 GNOME Released

  • Freespire 8.0 GNOME Released

    Today we have a very special release for you guys, Freespire 8.0 with the GNOME desktop. A freespire build with the GNOME desktop has been the most requested build that we have ever received. We do not like to release anything unless we think its functional, beautiful and ready. We released Freespire 8.0 last week to much fan fare. It was our most successful release to date. We have been working on the GNOME release for months and a testing issue kept us from releasing it with the XFCE build. This GNOME release is identical to the GNOME desktop release of Linspire.

    The GNOME release does not mean we will stop making an XFCE build. We will be doing both parallel with one another. Our GNOME release is based on GNOME 3.36.8. With Freespire 10 we will be moving to GNOME 4. Our GNOME desktop features a single panel with app launchers and "show applications" button which brings you to the App drawers.

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