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Cross-platform package building: Pkgsrc vs. Ravenports (1/2)

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GNU
Linux

This is the first of a two articles on cross-platform package management / package building. It covers the basics by discussing why it is actually surprisingly (to many people) difficult to do and what some of the problems are. It also takes a quick look at some strategies to solve the problem.

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More in Tux Machines

Ubuntu vs Manjaro: Comparing the Different Linux Experiences

Ubuntu is the most popular Debian-based Linux distribution for desktops and servers. And Manjaro Linux is an Arch-based distro tailored for desktops. Both are entirely different when it comes to user experience and features. However, one of the common grounds is the desktop environment when considering Manjaro’s GNOME edition with Ubuntu. But, what exactly are the differences? Is the package manager on Manjaro better? Are software tools available on both Ubuntu and Manjaro? Here, we shall look at the differences in both the Linux distributions at certain key points. Read more

today's leftovers

  • Experts urge VMware users to patch critical flaws right away

    Security professionals have warned that an authentication bypass flaw in VMware products needs to be patched as soon as possible to prevent its being exploited. VMware issued an advisory on Wednesday warning of the flaw affecting VMware Workspace ONE Access (Access), VMware Identity Manager (vIDM), VMware vRealize Automation (vRA), VMware Cloud Foundation and vRealize Suite Lifecycle Manager. Satnam Narang, staff research engineer at security outfit Tenable, said the vulnerabilities patched as part of VMware’s VMSA-2022-0014 advisory along with the Emergency Directive and associated alert published by the US’ Cybersecurity and Infrastructure Security Agency were an important reminder about the importance of patching vulnerabilities as early as possible.

  • EasyOS/Debian: Easy Bookworm version 0.3 released

    These are pre-alpha releases so far. When all the obvious bugs are found and it seems functionally equivalent to Easy Dunfell, then I will probably bump the version to match, say 3.5.

  • Time-out to explore ideas

    EasyOS is an experimental distribution, subject to change as I explore new ideas. I want to go into an exploratory binge now, toying with some fundamental structural changes, so might be a bit unresponsive to any questions posted on the forum.

  • Developer of popular noise suppression tool NoiseTorch has dev machine compromised

    Are you a user of NoiseTorch? It's a popular way of getting some pretty great noise suppression on your microphone, to keep out all that background noise or a hammer hitting your desk. Sadly, the developer had a machine compromised.

  • Kubernetes 1.24: Introducing Non-Graceful Node Shutdown Alpha

    Kubernetes v1.24 introduces alpha support for Non-Graceful Node Shutdown. This feature allows stateful workloads to failover to a different node after the original node is shutdown or in a non-recoverable state such as hardware failure or broken OS.

  • Intel Arc Graphics Cards Get 'VRAM Self-Refresh' Feature In Latest Linux Drivers

    Linux 5.19 kernel continues to see plenty of AMD, NVIDIA, and Intel updates. Intel is starting to slow down with its preparations for the company's Arc Alchemist and DG2 open-source drive support, moving towards a more standard starting requirement for their dGPU. Recently, additions to non-core features for the ARC graphics devices have appeared. One of these newest inclusions is vRAM Self-Refresh, or vRAM SR.

Devices/Embedded Leftovers

  • A teaspoon of computing in every subject: Broadening participation in computer science

    From May to November 2022, our seminars focus on the theme of cross-disciplinary computing. Through this seminar series, we want to explore the intersections and interactions of computing with all aspects of learning and life, and think about how they can help us teach young people. We were delighted to welcome Prof. Mark Guzdial (University of Michigan) as our first speaker.

  • Rockchip RK3588 Pico-ITX board launched with four-node cluster box (Crowdfunding) - CNX Software

    The Mixtile Blade 3 Pico-ITX single board computer (SBC) powered by Rockchip RK3588 processor has now launched on Crowd Supply with either 8GB or 16GB RAM, and an optional four-node cluster box with a built-in PCIe switch designed to accommodate four Mixtile Blade 3 boards. The board also comes with up to 128GB of storage, two 2.5GbE interfaces, HDMI 2.1 output, HDMI 2.0 input, USB 3.2 Gen 1 USB Type-C ports, as well as a mini PCIe Gen 2 for expansion and a 30-pin GPIO header for expansion, as well as U.2 edge connector with 12V, PCIe x4 Gen 3 and SATA signals to interface with other Mixtile boards and build clusters.

  • Put A New Spin On Your 3D Printed Parts

    Once you get tired of printing keychains and earbud holders with your 3D printer, you’ll want to design things a bit more sophisticated. How about things that rotate? [3DSage] has a good how-to about how to integrate a simple motor and controller into a few different size boxes. Combined with some 3D printed linkages, these boxes can turn your project — printed or otherwise — into something that spins.

Programming Leftovers

  • Things Are Getting Rusty In Kernel Land | Hackaday

    The other answer is that Rust is an easy fit with C code and kernel programming. Rust does it’s magic in the compiler. The code you write is what actually runs, without an interpreter or garbage collection trying to be helpful. Rust hasn’t overdosed on Object Oriented patterns, but meshes nicely with the C-style structs already used in the kernel. Even the stack model is very similar to C. There’s one problem with Rust’s memory-safe guarantee — it’s impossible to write a kernel that is formally memory-safe. A kernel has to write to unallocated memory, do weird pointer math, and other seemingly bizarre things to actually make our computers work. This doesn’t work well with a language that tries to guarantee that memory manipulations are safe. How do you write kernel code with Rust, then? Rust has added the unsafe keyword, allowing use of direct memory access and other such techniques that don’t work with Rusts’s memory guarantees. Keep the potential problems together, and it makes auditing easier. There’s at least one other language that may come to mind as an incremental update to C that tries to do some of these things: C++. Surely this would have been even a better fit, right? Kernel devs have some strong feelings about that idea. To put it gently, none of the improvements in C++ are useful in the context of the kernel, and some of the other changes just get in the way.

  • How to Get User Input in Java

    In programming languages, taking the user’s input is an essential task. In Java, multiple predefined classes are used to get the user’s input such as Scanner, BufferedReader, and Console class. All these classes utilizes various methods for handling input such as nextLine(), readLine(), etc.

  • How to convert string to int in Java

    Converting one data type to other data types is a common task in the prommer’s life. If we talk about the string to int conversion it can be achieved using two build-in methods i.e., Integer.ParseInt() and Integer.ValueOf(). Usually, we perform the string to int conversion when we have to execute mathematical operations over the strings containing numeric data.

  • Array of Pairs in C++

    The term pair refers to the combination of two values of different types. Pair allows you to keep two separate objects as a single unit. It is mostly utilized when storing tuples. The pair container is a basic container declared in the utility header that consists of two collected data or objects. The first element in the pair container is referred to as ‘first,’ while the second element is referred to as ‘second’, with the order fixed as (first, second). By default, the object of a specified array is allocated in a map or hash map of the type ‘pair,’ with all of the ‘first’ elements having unique keys paired with their ‘second’ value objects. To obtain the elements, we use the variable’s name followed by the dot operator and by the first or second keywords.

  • Dart Hello World

    Dart is a Google-developed static programming language. It allows for client-side and server-side application development. As per the GitHub adoption index, it has become the most widely used programming language because it incorporates the flutter toolkit. However, the Flutter Framework is commonly utilized in developing Android applications, iOS applications, IoT (Internet of Things), and online applications. Dart has a high syntactic and semantic similarity to JavaScript, Java, CPP, and python. It is a vibrant object-oriented language with lexical scope and closure. Dart was released in 2011, but it gained prominence after 2015 with the release of Dart 2.0. In this article, we will look at the basic representation of Dart syntax and how to print hello world in the dart programming language. The fundamental framework of Dart programming will be demonstrated here.