Language Selection

English French German Italian Portuguese Spanish

Open Hardware Leftovers

Filed under
Hardware
  • How I Built a Homelab on the Budget

    In my previous article, I discussed what is a Homelab and why you should (or should not) have one for yourself.

    Now, can anyone who wants or need, have a homelab? It depends on several things but money or resources can be worked around. In this article, I will explain how I have managed to have my own Homelab without investing a fortune in it. As a matter of fact, it costed me less than US $1,000 and it works good enough to manage my home's infrastructure requirements.

    That being said, it is important to mention as a disclaimer: this article doesn't describe the best way to do things. It just describes how I manage to make it work even knowing there are some issues and risks with it but for now, I am fine to live with these.

  • Want Octoprint But Lack A Raspberry Pi? Use An Old Android Phone | Hackaday

    3D printers and Octoprint have a long history together, and pre-built images for the Raspberry Pi make getting up and running pretty easy. But there’s also another easy way to get in on the Octoprint action, and that’s to run it on an Android phone with the octo4a project.

  • This Raspberry Pi Mini ITX Board Has Tons Of IO | Hackaday

    The Raspberry Pi now comes in a wide variety of versions. There are tiny little Zeros, and of course the mainstream-sized boards. Then, there’s the latest greatest Compute Module 4, ready to slot on to a carrier board to break out all its IO. The Seaberry is one such design, as demonstrated by [Jeff Geerling], giving the CM4 a Mini ITX formfactor and a ton of IO. (Video embedded after the break.)

    The Seaberry sports a full-sized x16 PCI-E port, with only 1x bandwidth but capable of holding full-sized cards. There’s also four mini-PCI-E slots along the top, with four M.2 E-key slots hiding underneath. The board then has a M.2 slot in the middle for NVME drives, and x1 PCI-E slot hanging off the side.

  • 2021 Open Source Pay-it-Forward Pi Giveaway

    To solve both problems, I'm doing a giveaway—to enter to win one of any of the pictured items below (and maybe a few others I can find lurking in my office), just donate or say thank you to any open source project or maintainer, then submit your entry.

  • Mini-ITX Seaberry adds 11 PCIe slots to a Raspberry Pi

    But it's definitely a specialty board. People who need a low-power ARM-based development or experimentation platform could use this board like I do, to test more exotic configurations on the Pi. And it's looking like it will be the first commercially-available (though not cheapest) ways to install a Pi into a standard desktop or rackmount PC case, since it's mini ITX.

  • xa 2.3.12

    I've updated xa, André Fachat's venerable 6502 cross-assembler, to version 2.3.12. This contains a bug fix for a regression in 65816 mode which I'd meant to release earlier but got sidetracked on (thanks Samuel Falvo for the nice test case, which is also incorporated into the suite). As with prior versions it is tested on pretty much all of my Un*x-alike systems here including AIX, Mac OS X (PowerPC, Intel and Apple Silicon), NetBSD/mac68k and Linux/ppc64le. I said this before for 2.3.11 but one more time for the record: this will probably be the last in the exceptionally long-lived 2.3 series before 2.4, which as I keep warning you will definitely have some minor compatibility breaks and jettison a couple long-deprecated options and syntaxes (but will have some new features to make up for it). Again, more to come on that.

More in Tux Machines

Android Leftovers

Everything You Need to Know about Linux Input-Output Redirection

Are you looking for information related to the Linux input-output redirection? Then, read on. So, what’s redirection? Redirection is a Linux feature. With the help of it, you are able to change standard I/O devices. In Linux, when you enter a command as an input, you receive an output. It’s the basic workflow of Linux. The standard input or stdin device to give commands is the keyboard and the standard output or stdout device is your terminal screen. With redirection, you can change the standard input/output. From this article, let’s find out how Linux input-output redirection works. Read more

today's howtos

  • How to Fix Screen Tearing on Linux

    Screen tearing can be frustrating when scrolling through articles, playing a game, or doing just about anything in the graphical user interface (GUI). It can hamper your Linux experience and drive you into thinking of switching to Windows or macOS. Hold those thoughts because, fortunately, there's a fix for screen tearing that doesn't involve migrating to another OS. Let's dive into the process of fixing screen tearing on your Linux desktop.

  • How to deploy a Docker container with SSH access | TechRepublic

    When you have running containers, there might be a time when you have to connect to that container to run a command or handle some maintenance. Of course, you can always access the running container using the docker exec -it CONTAINER_ID bash command (where CONTAINER_ID is the actual ID of the container). But how do you SSH into those containers? And should you want to? That’s the rub. The problem is that because there are so many moving parts, containers can be insecure. Because of that, you won’t want to allow SSH connections to containers in production environments, but for development and testing environments, this can be a real help. With that said, I’m going to show you how to set up SSH connections for a Docker container. I’ll demonstrate using the latest Ubuntu image.

  • How to flush the DNS cache on Ubuntu Server | TechRepublic

    Sometimes a network connection doesn’t seem to function how we expect them to. And it doesn’t matter how much you troubleshoot the issue, the problem doesn’t go away. You’ve configured a static IP address, you know that configuration is solid and you can ping your gateway, but something is causing that Linux server from reaching the outside world in the manner you expect. One problem could be the DNS cache. DNS is a crucial aspect of networking for all machines, as it translates names to IP addresses. When something goes wrong with DNS, your machine might have trouble reaching the outside world. I have experienced, on a few occasions, a DNS cache to be the problem. When that happens, what do you do? You flush the DNS cache. This is a good task to undertake now and then, as your DNS cache can not only grow too large, but it could also contain corrupt entries (which can cause problems with connections). So, how do you flush the DNS cache on Ubuntu Server?

  • How to Fix "Could not get lock /var/lib/dpkg/lock" Error in Ubuntu

    In this article we’ll cover the cause of the Could not get lock /var/lib/dpkg/lock – open (11 Resource temporarily unavailable) error, and two methods on how to solve it.

  • How To Install Bpytop on Ubuntu 22.04 LTS - idroot

    In this tutorial, we will show you how to install Bpytop on Ubuntu 22.04 LTS. For those of you who didn’t know, Bpytop is a Linux command-line utility for resource monitoring that shows usage and stats for processor, memory, disks, network, and processes. This article assumes you have at least basic knowledge of Linux, know how to use the shell, and most importantly, you host your site on your own VPS. The installation is quite simple and assumes you are running in the root account, if not you may need to add ‘sudo‘ to the commands to get root privileges. I will show you the step-by-step installation of the Bpytop system monitor tool on Ubuntu 22.04 (Jammy Jellyfish). You can follow the same instructions for Ubuntu 22.04 and any other Debian-based distribution like Linux Mint, Elementary OS, Pop!_OS, and more as well.

  • 10 basic cat commands in Linux with examples - RoseHosting

    In this tutorial, we are going to explain some basic cat commands in Linux, that are applicable on various distributions such as Ubuntu, Debian, CentOS, AlmaLinux and etc. The “cat” command is a shortcut of the word “concatenate” and is a very useful command that is frequently used, by system administrators and DevOps engineers. With this command you can easily view files, create them, filter information from them, display line numbers in files and etc. In this post, the cat command will be explained with real examples on Ubuntu 20.04. You can use the Linux distribution of your choice. Let’s get started!

Linux 5.17.9, 5.15.41, 5.10.117, 5.4.195, 4.19.244, 4.14.280, and 4.9.315

  • Linux 5.17.9
    I'm announcing the release of the 5.17.9 kernel.
    
    All users of the 5.17 kernel series must upgrade.
    
    The updated 5.17.y git tree can be found at:
    	git://git.kernel.org/pub/scm/linux/kernel/git/stable/linux-stable.git linux-5.17.y
    and can be browsed at the normal kernel.org git web browser:
    	https://git.kernel.org/?p=linux/kernel/git/stable/linux-s...
    
    thanks,
    
    greg k-h
    
  • Linux 5.15.41
  • Linux 5.10.117
  • Linux 5.4.195
  • Linux 4.19.244
  • Linux 4.14.280
  • Linux 4.9.315