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today's howtos

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HowTos
  • How to Install Asterisk VoIP Server on Debian 11 | 10 - Linux Shout

    In this tutorial, we will discuss some of the steps and commands to install the Asterisk VoIP server on Debian 11 Bullseye or 10 Buster using the terminal to call over Android or iPhone using a local network.

  • How to Install PyCharm on Debian 11 Bullseye

    PyCharm is a dedicated Python graphical IDE (Integrated Development Environment) popular amongst Python developers with its wide range of essential tools such as analyzing code, debugging, and integration. The IDE also comes with the command line, connects to a database, creates a virtual environment, and manages your version control system (Git).

    In the following tutorial, you will learn how to install PyCharm Community, Professional or Educational, with Flatpak or Snapcraft (Snap) on Debian 11 Bullseye.

  • Install apps on Linux with Flatpak | Opensource.com

    Computer applications consist of many small files that are linked together to perform a set of tasks. Because they get presented as "apps," colorful icons in the menu or on a desktop, most of us think of applications as a single, almost tangible thing. And in a way, it's comforting to think of them that way because they feel manageable that way. If an application is actually the amalgamation of hundreds of little library and asset files scattered throughout your computer, where's the application? And existential crisis aside, what happens when one application needs one version of a library while another application demands a different version?

  • Easily Install PowerDNS Admin on Debian 11/Debian 10 - kifarunix.com

    In this tutorial, you will learn how to easily install PowerDNS Admin on Debian 11/Debian 10. PowerDNS Admin is a web administrative interface for PowerDNS. It enables you to easily create and manage DNS zones from a web browser.

  • See, Multi-Account Containers extension is not needed to use Containers in Firefox – LinuxBSDos.com

    That last bit about integration with Mozilla VPN is new and can be useful in some edge situations. But we won’t get into that in this article. Let’s just focus on Containers. Like I said earlier, I’ve always relied on the Firefox Multi-Account Containers extension because I thought that was the easiest method of managing Firefox containers. But what I didn’t know is that the features that the Firefox Multi-Account Containers bring to the table are already built into Firefox Core, so all that’s needed to make them shine is to just make 2 changes in the Firefox via about:config.

    Those 2 changes will give me the same functionalities as the Firefox Multi-Account Containers. So that’s what I’m going to show you show to do in this post. To begin, open a tab and type about:config in the address bar. After clicking through whatever prompt or warning it throws up, type privacy.user in the search bar. The two preferences you’re looking for are privacy.userContext.enabled and privacy.userContext.ui.enabled. Figure 2 shows both preferences in their default state – false. Notice that if you long left-click the new tab (+) button before installing the Firefox Multi-Account Containers extension and with both preferences in their default state, that noting happens.

  • [Old] Migrating Technical Docs from Jekyll to Hugo+Docsy

    Recently, I migrated Graphviz'technical documentation from the Jekyll static site generator to the Hugo static site generator, and specifically the Docsy Hugo theme for technical documentation.

    I thought it would be straightforward to move static site generators, but it turned out rather difficult, so perhaps it's worth writing about. Good technical doc infra is underrated. I hope this will be useful to write about for anyone considering a move from Jekyll to Hugo, or anyone interested in an evaluation of Docsy.

  • Log backtraces at obfuscated Android methods

    If you have the source code to the app, and the app is in debug mode (not obfuscated by ProGuard), this is easy: open Android Studio, click in the left-margin of the source code to add a breakpoint, untick the "Suspend" checkbox and tick the "Logging Options – Stack trace" checkbox.

  • Simple network dashboard with vnstat

    Hi! If you run a server or a router, you may want to have a nice view of the bandwidth usage and statistics. This is easy and quick to achieve using vnstat software. It will gather data regularly from network interfaces and store it in rrd files, it's very efficient and easy to use, and its companion program vnstati can generate pictures, perfect for easy visualization.

  • The Pagination Predicament

    Previously there were 10 posts to a page, then you had to click through to the next page to see more posts. I have nearly 250 posts on this site now; ain’t no-one got time to be wading through 25 pages of blog posts!

    So now, all my posts render on a single page. To help you further, posts can be filtered by category at the top of the main blog page.

    Since I don’t have any featured images being displayed in my posts feed, the page still loads really quickly. Even when rendering ~250 posts.

  • How we use the SLURM job scheduler system on our compute servers

    Our motivation for using SLURM at all is that we have a pool of compute servers of varying capacity, and some GPU servers as well. A few of these compute servers are general login servers, but the problem with these is that they're a free for all; anyone can log in at any time and start using CPU (and perhaps memory, although that can't be fair-share scheduled so it's first come, first served). Traditionally people have wanted to reserve some dedicated amount of resources that are theirs for some amount of time. Well, SLURM does that.

  • Why region based memory allocation help with fragmentation

    Overall, I think we can say that region allocation reduces fragmentation by making the order of allocating and freeing memory less important. If you intermix allocating a bunch of different sized objects and then don't free all of them (or delay freeing them for a long time), in a simple allocator you wind up with allocated holes in your free ranges. In a region allocator, those different sized allocations go to different regions, and failing to free all of the objects of one size (in one region) doesn't cause problems for other regions of other sizes.

  • Computation that needs to be "secure" is everywhere in practice

    The problem is that we have wound up with a lot of things on our devices that we want to keep confidential, or in another perspective we've wound up in a world where a lot of untrusted things have an inordinate amount of access to our devices. Cryptographic keys are the tip of the iceberg; there are also access tokens in the form of cookies, JWTs, and all of the other forms they take, URLs that we visit, apps that we use, what we type on the keyboard, and on and on and on. We are barely keeping up with identifying what's sensitive and needs to be kept confidential, never mind actually controlling snooping on it.

More in Tux Machines

6 Reasons to Pick Linux Over Windows

Almost all students do their work on laptops and PCs that run on Windows. Of course, some of you are lucky enough to afford something that runs on Apple’s macOS. While Windows is a popular OS, it’s far from being perfect. Few students are even aware that their PCs and laptops can run on various operating systems.

One of the alternatives students often overlook is Linux. Many believe that this OS is hard to manage. That’s why they prefer to either buy or, in some cases, pirate Microsoft’s creation unless it comes pre-installed on the device, of course.

It’s true that Linux is harder to install than its counterpart. But it has a lot more to offer than meets the eye. So, what exactly sets it apart?

Read more

today's leftovers

  • Planet Incinerating Technology | LINUX Unplugged 441

    We make some last-minute changes to our server setup and catch up on a bunch of thought-provoking feedback. Special Guests: Martin Wimpress and Neal Gompa.

  • GNU World Order 443
  • LibreSSL update

    Undeadly reached out to Theo asking whether he would share with readers an explanation of the changes. He kindly responded: [...]

  • Early Days at Bell Labs

    It's Brian Kernighan discussing the formation of Unix, starting from the back story of the creation of Bell Labs, including predecessors CTSS and Multics, and C predecessors BCPL which was modified to become B, and why Dennis Richie added types to B to make C.

    This video really hits its stride when Kernighan discusses piping and redirection, and the ease of creating wonderful things out of small parts that, and Kernighan used these words, "do one thing and do it well."

What Distribution and Version Pulled You into Linux?

I recently watched a video posted by my good friend (and former Linux Journal colleague) Shawn Powers introducing viewers to Linux and Linux distributions. And it got me thinking about my own personal experience and when I first started to dabble in the world of open source operating systems.

Read
more

The best Linux distributions for 2022

The year 2022 is upon us! That means it’s time to choose a new Linux distribution. Here’s a list of the best Linux distributions for 2022 that will help you not get lost in the variety of versions of your favorite operating system. Read more