Language Selection

English French German Italian Portuguese Spanish

Free, Open, Eating Its Young

Filed under
OSS

The FOSS (Free/Open Source Software) world is cram-full of interesting, smart, fun people. It's also full of trolls, jerks, and abusive wastes of time, and very confused when it comes to civility. A lot of FOSSers fall into the Five Geek Social Fallacies trap, especially the first two:

Geek Social Fallacy #1: Ostracizers Are Evil

"GSF1 prevents its carrier from participating in -- or tolerating -- the exclusion of anyone from anything, be it a party, a comic book store, or a web forum, and no matter how obnoxious, offensive, or aromatic the prospective excludee may be. As a result, nearly every geek social group of significant size has at least one member that 80% of the members hate, and the remaining 20% merely tolerate."

Geek Social Fallacy #2: Friends Accept Me As I Am

Full Story.

Good article

It's appalling to see how women sometimes get treated in IT, esp. greeted with prejudice. Writers such as Carla, PJ and also yourself help change perception, kill the stereotypes and hopefully end comment abuse. It's a good thing you don't allow anonymous comments.

re: Good article

I haven't experienced too many "bad behaviors" other than the usual sexual harassment in real life. On the internet I've rarely been treated badly. I think it all depends on your attitude and how you talk to folks more than what sex you are.

Yeah, I disabled anonymous comments due to the spammers tho. Now they are signing up and posting it. You just about can't beat spammer. However there are groups that are trying. But that's another story.

As for the real life sexual harassment... I miss those days! Laughing j/k

You're using Drual, which is

You're using Drual, which is popular. People have signup/posting scripts for it and they work on a series of sites to make spamming more effective. It's the cost of using popular software, which sometimes needs to be put to rest as a result (too much 'maintenance').

Comment viewing options

Select your preferred way to display the comments and click "Save settings" to activate your changes.

More in Tux Machines

Programming Leftovers

  • Excellent Free Tutorials to Learn CoffeeScript

    CoffeeScript is a very succinct programming language that transcompiles into JavaScript, so there is no interpretation at runtime. The syntax is inspired by Ruby, Python and Haskell, and implements many features from these three languages. CoffeeScript is closely related to JavaScript without having its eccentricities. However, CoffeeScript offers more than fixing many of the oddities of JavaScript, as it has some useful features including array comprehensions, prototype aliases and classes. It allows developers to write less code to get more done. CoffeeScript is a new language, first appearing in 2009. The first stable release shortly followed in December 2010.

  • Robert Foss: Speed up `git log --graph` 18x times

    This is a speed up of ~18x, compared to the older versions. The way this works is that commit-graph file stores the commit graph structure along with some extra metadata to speed up graph in the .git/objects/info directory.

  • 15 years of Git: How to get started or learn something new

    x If there's anything that's changed software in the past two decades, Git is at the top of the list. If you don't use Git personally, you might think it's just a tech fad, an incidental darling among developers just because it was created by the same person who started the Linux project itself. There may be some truth to that, but Git does manage to achieve some feats that no other industry has managed. With Git, developers spread all over the world are able to work on the same code, literally at the same time, with a history of every change made, and then merge all the work together to result in a finished product. The complexity is enormous, and so the tool itself can get complex, but in the end, it's a major component in keeping the software industry running. Whether you know Git or not, you'll very likely encounter it should you dig deep enough into open source software or enter into computer science. Whether you use Git to just download an installer package or whether you interface with it daily to manage code, learning more about it is elucidating and empowering.

  • EBCDIC Handling Library: A Ruby Project

    As long as we are going to be cooped up with the current pandemic, and to keep my sanity going, I decided to revive a software project that was the basis for my development of credit reporting software, the ASCII to EBCDIC translator. As long as I am going to revive this project, I may as well make a library of functions that handle data in EBCDIC with translations to and from ASCII. Of course, I would have to include UTF-8 and UTF-16 as these character codes did not exist back in the 1990s. [...] One thing that EBCDIC and ASCII have in common is that each character takes up exactly one byte of storage. But that is where the similarity ends. Standard ASCII is actually seven bits long and has numeric values ranging from 0 to 127 (or 0x00 to 0x7f in hexidecimal). So what happens to the eighth bit? Standard ASCII has no default action for characters containing the eighth bit (hexidecimal values of 0x80 to 0xFF.) In practice, however, the eighth bit is typically used for displaying character graphics, i.e. symbols that are typically used to create things like windows on a text display, or large sized logos. This character set can be found on 8-bit machines like the Commodore PET/VIC-20/64/128, the Atari 8-bit line of machines, and even the IBM-PC models 5150, 5160 and 5170 (commonly known as the IBM-PC, XT and AT)

Python Programming

  • CircuitBrains Deluxe is a Tiny, CircuitPython-compatible Module (Crowdfunding)

    There are plenty of boards with Adafruit’s CircuitPython support, but Microchip SAMD51 powered CircuitBrains Deluxe is a little different since it’s a module with castellated holes that make it easy to solder to your own baseboard or integrate into a space-constrained product.

  • Arduino With Python: How to Get Started

    Microcontrollers have been around for a long time, and they’re used in everything from complex machinery to common household appliances. However, working with them has traditionally been reserved for those with formal technical training, such as technicians and electrical engineers. The emergence of Arduino has made electronic application design much more accessible to all developers. In this course, you’ll discover how to use Arduino with Python to develop your own electronic projects.

  • Webinar: “How To Build Real-Time Interactions In Your Django 3 App” with Calvin Hendryx-Parker

    Django 3 has been making the rounds, so time for a webinar showing how to use the new features within PyCharm Professional. Calvin Hendryx-Parker from Six Feet Up, previous webinar presenter, is returning to give us the highlights.

  • Python 101 – Working with Strings

    You will be using strings very often when you program. A string is a series of letters surrounded by single, double or triple quotes. Python 3 defines string as a “Text Sequence Type”. You can cast other types to a string using the built-in str() function.

  • S. Lott: The COBOL Problem

    First. Replacing COBOL with something shiny and new is more-or-less impossible. Replacing COBOL is a two-step job. 1. Replace the COBOL with something that's nearly identical but written in a new language. Python. Java. Scala. Whatevs. Language doesn't matter. What matters is the hugeness of this leap.

  • Flask Delicious Tutorial : Building a Library Management System Part 2 - Start With A Loaded Skeleton

    In this tutorial we'll be seeing how to run a minimal app. So that you can focus on the material, i've created a repo for you with some libs loaded.

PCLinuxOS Screenshots and Member Highlights

  • [PCLinuxOS] Screenshot Showcase
  • PCLinuxOS Family Member Spotlight: mutse

    I started with 'Linux' after reading a magazine with a DVD with a number of 'Linux distros' in it, after it was mentioned that Windows XP would no longer be supported and would no longer receive security updates. I also did so out of curiosity and as a new challenge, in my already richly filled career. I "hopped" from one distro to another and then, by chance, ended up at PCLinuxOS. I then registered on the Dutch forum (pclinuxos.nl) where I got a certain name, A.J. Baudrez (Wamukota), discovered and also read that he lived in Bruges (also read in the PCLinuxOS Magazine). After I contacted Alain, I was invited to come to the "Brutux" meeting(s). That's how I 'rolled' into that Linux world. I still go there every month. I am very happy that I have discovered PCLinuxOS (and Linux in general). I've already received a lot of help from DeBaas (both at the forum and personally in The Hague Netherlands, where he works as a volunteer in the computer club), also Alain and everyone here at the USA PCLinuxOS forum. Many thanks for that. I wish I had so much knowledge.

Tails 4.5 is out

This release fixes many security vulnerabilities. You should upgrade as soon as possible. Read more