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Open Hardware/Modding With Components, Arduino

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  • Automating Pool Monitoring And Chemical Dosing | Hackaday

    The project uses a TI SimpleLink wireless-enabled microcontroller to run the show, which allows data to be offloaded to a base station for graphing with Grafana. The system can monitor pH levels as well as ORP (oxidation/reduction potential) levels using probes attached via BNC connectors. Based on these readings, the device can dose chlorine into the pool as needed using a peristaltic pump driven by a TI DRV8426 stepper motor driver.

  • $99 Lepton FS module cuts the cost of FLIR thermal cameras by half - CNX Software

    Thermal cameras based on FLIR Lepton modules are pretty cool, but also quite expensive. Teledyne FLIR Lepton FS offers a much more cost-effective solution with the non-radiometric 160 x 120 resolution micro thermal camera module going for $99, or about 50% less than other FLIR thermal camera modules.

    The lower cost was achieved with some tradeoffs, notably a reduction of thermal sensitivity and scene dynamic range, as well as up to 3% inoperable pixels. But Ron Justin, GroupGets founder, told CNX Software that the lower specs are more than worth it for users only needing an imager, as opposed to a radiometric sensor.

  • Raspberry Pi Weekly Issue #374 - Raspberry Pi <3 LEGO Education

    The collaboration of your dreams launched this week. We worked with LEGO® Education to design the new Raspberry Pi Build HAT, a brand-new product that for the first time makes it easy to integrate LEGO® Technic™ motors and sensors with Raspberry Pi computers.

  • Bring That Old Hi-Fi Into The 2020s | Hackaday

    It’s a distressing moment for some of us, when a formerly prized piece of electronic equipment reaches a point of obsolescence that we consider jettisoning it. [Jon Robinson] ran into this dilemma by finding the Kenwood Hi-Fi amplifier his 17-year-old self had spent his savings on. It was a very good amp back in the day, but over two decades later, it’s no longer an object of desire in a world of soundbars and streaming music boxes. After a earlier upgrade involving an Arduino to auto-power it he’s now given it an ESP32 and an i2S codec which performs the task of digital audio streaming as well as a better job than the Arduino of controlling the power.

  • This Arduino Terminal Does All The Characters | Hackaday

    The job of a dumb terminal was originally to be a continuation of that performed by a paper teletype, to send text from its keyboard and display any it receives on its screen. But as the demands of computer systems extended beyond what mere ASCII could offer, their capabilities were extended with extra characters and graphical extensions whose descendants we see in today’s Unicode character sets and thus even in all those emojis on your mobile phone. Thus a fully-featured terminal has a host of semigraphics characters from which surprisingly non-textual output can be created. It’s something [Michael Rule] has done some work on, with his ILI9341TTY, a USB serial terminal monitor using an Arduino Uno and an ILI9341 LCD module that supports as many of the extended characters as possible.

More in Tux Machines

Programming Leftovers

  • An outdated Python for openSUSE Leap [LWN.net]

    Enterprise distributions are famous for maintaining the same versions of software throughout their, normally five-year-plus, support windows. But many of the projects those distributions are based on have far shorter support periods; part of what the enterprise distributions sell is patching over those mismatches. But openSUSE Leap is not exactly an enterprise distribution, so some users are chafing under the restrictions that come from Leap being based on SUSE Enterprise Linux (SLE). In particular, shipping Python 3.6, which reached its end of life at the end of 2021, is seen as problematic for the upcoming Leap 15.4 release. [...] OpenSUSE and SLE have generally been aligned over the years. In 2020, Leap and SLE grew even closer together. The build system and repositories between the two were shared starting with Leap 15.2, which corresponded to the second "service pack" (SP) of SLE (i.e. SLE 15-SP2). In 2021, with Leap 15.3 and SLE 15-SP3, the two distributions effectively merged, such that all of the base packages were shared between the two. To a first approximation, Leap is an openSUSE-branded version of SLE, much like what CentOS used to be for Red Hat Enterprise Linux.

  • Make Your Python CLI Tools Pop With Rich | Hackaday

    It seems as though more and more of the simple command-line tools and small scripts that used to be bash or small c programs are slowly turning into python programs. Of course, we will just have to wait and see if this ultimately turns out to be a good idea. But in the meantime, next time you’re revamping or writing a new tool, why not spice it up with Rich?

  • An outdated Python for openSUSE Leap [LWN.net]

    Enterprise distributions are famous for maintaining the same versions of software throughout their, normally five-year-plus, support windows. But many of the projects those distributions are based on have far shorter support periods; part of what the enterprise distributions sell is patching over those mismatches. But openSUSE Leap is not exactly an enterprise distribution, so some users are chafing under the restrictions that come from Leap being based on SUSE Enterprise Linux (SLE). In particular, shipping Python 3.6, which reached its end of life at the end of 2021, is seen as problematic for the upcoming Leap 15.4 release. [...] OpenSUSE and SLE have generally been aligned over the years. In 2020, Leap and SLE grew even closer together. The build system and repositories between the two were shared starting with Leap 15.2, which corresponded to the second "service pack" (SP) of SLE (i.e. SLE 15-SP2). In 2021, with Leap 15.3 and SLE 15-SP3, the two distributions effectively merged, such that all of the base packages were shared between the two. To a first approximation, Leap is an openSUSE-branded version of SLE, much like what CentOS used to be for Red Hat Enterprise Linux.

  • Make Your Python CLI Tools Pop With Rich | Hackaday

    It seems as though more and more of the simple command-line tools and small scripts that used to be bash or small c programs are slowly turning into python programs. Of course, we will just have to wait and see if this ultimately turns out to be a good idea. But in the meantime, next time you’re revamping or writing a new tool, why not spice it up with Rich?

Linuxfx 11.1 WxDesktop 11.0.3

It is with great pleasure that we announce the release of Linuxfx version 11.1.1103. This update releases several new features for the operating system. The system kernel has been updated to version 5.13, bringing better support for more modern hardware. System tools gained new translations: French, German, Italian, Japanese, Chinese, Spanish, American and Portuguese is now supported for WxDesktop. Android support has been improved, now in addition to supporting opengl, we also release support for Vulkan (experimental). Finally, all system packages have been updated, including WxDesktop, Onlyoffice and many others. The image has been scaled down to fit on a DVD. Users of older versions will receive this update over the internet. New users can download the new image from our portal. Read more

Audiocasts/Shows: TLLTS, Going Linux, and FLOSS Weekly

  • The Linux Link Tech Show Episode 939

    Joel aint got no time for outlook! He is too busy working jenkins.

  • Going Linux #417 · A Tribute To Tom

    We remember former co-host, Tom with a re-broadcast of Tom at his best in episode 180, Listener Feedback and an interview with Jonathan Nadeau.

  • FLOSS Weekly 664: Tailscale - Avery Pennarun, VPN

    Avery Pennarun of Tailscale and much more, blows the minds of Doc Searls and Aaron Newcomb on a can't-miss show that explains how the best development is all "chickens and eggs." Pennarun explains thatfree software and open source is the gifting nature of the former, and how startups succeed and fail at crossing chasms. All while touching on so much more that we now have a Part 2 of the discussion planned.

Android Leftovers