Language Selection

English French German Italian Portuguese Spanish

This week in KDE: Fingerprint reader and NVIDIA GBM support!

Filed under
KDE

Two big features landed this week: support for fingerprint readers and the NVIDIA driver’s GBM backend!

Fingerprint support has been in progress for quite some time thanks to Devin Lin, and this week, it was merged for Plasma 5.24! So far we let you enroll and de-enroll fingers, and any of those fingers can be used to to unlock the screen, provide authentication when an app asks for your password, and also authenticate sudo on the command line! It’s really cool stuff.

Read more

KDE Plasma Readies Its NVIDIA GBM Support

  • KDE Plasma Readies Its NVIDIA GBM Support, Fingerprint Authentication Added - Phoronix

    It's been an exciting week for KDE developers with preparing their formal support for handling NVIDIA's driver with GBM support as well as getting fingerprint authentication finally in place, among other improvements.

    The autumn excitement for KDE developers this week included:

    - Initial support for the NVIDIA driver with KDE Plasma 5.23.2's GBM back-end. In conjunction with the NVIDIA 495 Linux driver beta exposing Generic Buffer Manager support, Plasma 5.23.2+ will play nicely with that new driver support on Wayland.

KDE Plasma gets fingerprint reader support

  • KDE Plasma gets fingerprint reader support, plus preliminary support for NVIDIA GBM | GamingOnLinux

    The team at KDE are producing upgrades for Plasma very quickly, with another weekly update out from developer Nate Graham with some major new bits being hooked up.

    In preparation for the next Plasma release, a fingerprint manager has been added so that Plasma will support fingerprint authentication in the next version. This expanded support allows you to use your fingers for passworded operations like using sudo, unlocking the screen and more.

    Perhaps the bigger one though is initial support for NVIDIA's new GBM (Generic Buffer Manager) backend, which arrived in the recent NVIDIA Beta 495.29.05 driver. This means that eventually when it's stable in NVIDIA drivers, along with a new Plasma release, that KDE should default to it for NVIDIA giving a much improved Wayland session experience. They still have some quirks to work out but it's getting there now.

KDE Plasma 5.24 Introduces Fingerprint Reader Support

  • KDE Plasma 5.24 Introduces Fingerprint Reader Support

    KDE Developer, Nate Graham, announced last week that KDE Plasma would be receiving fingerprint reader support in the upcoming 5.24 release. The added support has been a work in progress for some time, but Devin Lin (the primary developer on the feature) finally merged it into 5.24.

    As of now, the fingerprint reader support will allow you to enroll and unenroll fingerprints. Any enrolled fingerprint can then be used to unlock the screen, provide authentication for an app, and authenticate for sudo usage.

    The developers have created a user-friendly GUI for onboarding fingerprints, which can be found in System Settings, but will (obviously) require either a built-in or external fingerprint reader to use. The one caveat is finding an external fingerprint reader that is fully supporte

Comment viewing options

Select your preferred way to display the comments and click "Save settings" to activate your changes.

More in Tux Machines

Best Open Source Gantt Chart Software for Linux

Gantt chart is the simplest way to assign resources, manage timelines, and visualize dependencies. It helps you to avoid confusion and cut unproductive events. With a glance, you can have all activities, allocated assets, and the scheduled dates of each. While a Gantt chart is a must for any complex project, in general, you need this project management tool: Read more

NuTyX 21.10.5 available with cards 2.4.140

The NuTyX team is happy to announce the new version of NuTyX 21.10.0 and cards 2.4.138. The xorg-server graphics server version 21.1.1, the Mesa 3D library in 21.2.5, Gtk4 4.4.0 and Qt 5.15.2. The python interpreters are en 3.10.0 et 2.7.18. The XFCE desktop environment is updated to version 4.16. The MATE desktop environment is a 1.26 version . The GNOME desktop environment is also updated to version 40.1.1 The KDE desktop environment is available in Plasma 5.23.3, Framework 5.88.0 and applications in 21.08.3. Available browsers are: Firefox 94.0.2, Chromium 96.0.4664.45, Epiphany 40.3, etc Many desktop applications have been updated as well like Thunderbird 91.2.0, Scribus 1.5.7, Libreoffice 7.1.5.2, Gimp 2.10.28, etc. Read more

System Monitoring Center is an Ideal Task Manager & Resource Monitor for Linux

Graphically monitoring the system resources may not be the best experience on Linux. The system monitoring tool that comes baked in with your desktop environment might limit the details. For instance, GNOME’s system monitor does not display the CPU frequency and temperatures. In addition, the default system monitor applications available for Linux usually aim for simplicity instead of providing detailed insights. Read more

today's leftovers

  • How Ubuntu Boosts Developer Desktop Productivity | Ubuntu

    Seventeen years after its first release, Ubuntu is firmly established as the Linux developer desktop of choice around the world. From education through to enterprise, Ubuntu delivers the tools developers need to succeed across their careers. In this blog, we will cover the main aspects that contribute to this success. [...] Developers start their careers with Ubuntu, and 69% of student developers reported that they prefer Ubuntu as an OS. It’s not surprising. With Ubuntu, they gain access to the best of open source, including AI/ML frameworks, such as Pytorch and TensorFlow, ROS for robotics and LXD and multipass for virtualisation. Open source technology is now a critical part of any enterprise, and familiarity with open source is a key consideration in hiring. As a result, getting new developers onboarded and productive quickly is easier with Ubuntu. It’s a system they’re familiar with. It’s flexible and customisable. And, as an operating system, it spans both the workstation and the cloud, providing a consistent development experience across your technology stack.

  • Our 12 favorite Arduino UNO projects | Arduino Blog

    The UNO wasn’t Arduino’s first board, and it won’t be its last. There have been many varieties of microcontroller and maker boards before and after the UNO, but none have been as iconic. As we cross the epic milestone of 10 million UNOs sold and the launch of the UNO Mini Limited Edition, we decided it was time to take a look back at some of our favorite UNO projects from the last 10 years. And we want to hear about yours, too. Join us over on social media to share your favorite UNO projects, whether you built them yourself or marveled at someone else’s electronic creation.

  • Personal computer maker Raspberry Pi plans London listing

    The company behind Britain's best-selling personal computer is preparing the ground for a spring listing which is expected to value it at more than £370m.

    The trading arm of the Raspberry Pi Foundation has hired bankers from Stifel and Liberum to advise on a London float after securing a $45m (£33m) investment in September.

    The Cambridge-based foundation offloaded stakes to Lansdowne Partners and the Ezrah Charitable Trust to fund product development and marketing after seeing booming demand for its miniature personal computers during lockdown.

  • Mozilla Privacy Blog: Mozilla files comments on UK Data Protection Consultation

    Mozilla recently submitted its comments to a public consultation on reforming the UK’s data protection regime launched by the UK Department for Digital, Culture, Media & Sport. With the public consultation, titled ‘Data: A New Direction’, the UK government set out to re-evaluate the UK’s approach to data protection after no longer being bound by the bloc’s General Data Protection Regulation (GDPR). We took this opportunity to share our thoughts on data stewardship and the role effective regulation can play in addressing the lopsided power dynamics between large data collectors and users. For Mozilla, privacy is not optional. It is an integral aspect of our Manifesto, which states that individuals’ security and privacy on the internet are fundamental and must not be treated as optional. This is why privacy is at the core of our product work and why we have long promoted robust data protection in our policy and advocacy work. Further, Mozilla’s Data Futures Lab is exploring alternative approaches to data governance and promoting data stewardship through original research and support to builders.

  • 42 things I learned from building a production database

    In 2017, I went to Facebook on a sabbatical from my faculty position at Yale. I created a team to build a storage system called Delos at the bottom of the Facebook stack (think of it as Facebook’s version of Chubby). We hit production with a 3-person team in less than a year; and subsequently scaled the team to 30+ engineers spanning multiple sub-teams. In the four years that I led the team (until Spring 2021), we did not experience a single severe outage (nothing higher than a SEV3). The Delos design is well-documented in two academic papers (in OSDI 2020 and SOSP 2021). Delos is currently replacing all uses of ZooKeeper at Facebook.

    Here are some of the things I learned as the tech lead for Delos. My intent in publishing this is to help others in similar roles (leading teams that are building new infra at large companies); much of it may not generalize to different settings.