Language Selection

English French German Italian Portuguese Spanish

today's leftovers (mostly programming)

Filed under
Development
  • Turn any device with a browser into a secondary screen with Deskreen!

    Deskreen in action (src. Deskreen) Many computer users require extending their workspace with other monitors, like developers, software engineers, news reporters, and business analysts.

    [...]

    The project is a community-based product, which was released under the AGPL-3.0 License and maintained by a team of professionals.

  • You Can Now Directly Read Data Logs From Tesla Vehicles (Jalopnik) [LWN.net]

    The Jalopnik automotive site has posted an article on a (relatively) new set of open-source tools that can extract log data from Tesla cars.

  • You Can Now Directly Read Data Logs From Tesla Vehicles

    The Netherlands Forensic Institute has reverse-engineered Tesla's file format and released the tools to interpret data...

  • Package updates as a result from the switch to Python 3.10 in Slackware-current

    When Python3 was updated from 3.9 to 3.10 in Slackware-current two weeks ago, lots of 3rd-party packages (i.e. software packages that are not part of the Slackware distro itself) containing python modules were suddenly broken.

    To make things more complex, not all Python software is currently compatible with Python 3.10. Patrick Volkerding opened a poll on LinuxQuestions.org to get feedback from the community about this intrusive update after we already have a Slackware 15.0 Release Candidate since mid-august.
    After all, when you tag a Release Candidate, that usually sends a signal that the software set is frozen and only usability issues and software bugs will be addressed.

    After giving this some time to sink in and hoping that this update would be reverted because of its impact, I now think we are stuck with Python 3.10 in Slackware. Which means I had to start looking at which of my own packages are now broken.

  • Announcing Rust 1.56.0 and Rust 2021 [LWN.net]

    The Rust language project has announced the release of stable version 1.56.0 and the Rust 2021 edition.

  • Announcing Rust 1.56.0 and Rust 2021

    The Rust team is happy to announce a new version of Rust, 1.56.0. This stabilizes the 2021 edition as well. Rust is a programming language empowering everyone to build reliable and efficient software.

  • Federico Mena-Quintero: Text in librsvg starts to get better

    Up to now, text support in librsvg has been fairly limited. The text chapter in the SVG spec is pretty big and it contains features that are very much outside of my experience (right-to-left languages, vertical text). But now I think I have a plan for how to improve the text features.

    [...]

    All those fixes will appear in librsvg 2.52.3, due in a few days.

    I want to add more tests for right-to-left and bidi text; they can be affected by many properties for which there are no tests right now.

    After bidi text works reasonably well, I want to add support for positioning individual glyphs with the x/y/dx/dy properties. People from Wikimedia Commons really want this, to be able to lay out equations and such.

    Once individual glyphs can be positioned independently, maybe textPath support, which cartographers really like for curved labels.

  • Felix Häcker: #14 Well-Rounded

    Update on what happened across the GNOME project in the week from October 08 to October 15.

  • PSA: Plasma Browser Integration Currently Unavailable

    A fix is being worked on, but might take a bit, sorry about that.