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IBM/Red Hat Leftovers

Filed under
Red Hat
  • IBM Proposing A CPU Namespace For The Linux Kernel

    IBM engineer Pratik Sampat published an early prototype of a CPU namespace interface for the Linux kernel. This CPU namespace was devised to address coherency issues with current means of viewing available CPU resources as well as addressing possible security issues stemming from understanding resource access/positioning on the system.

  • MontaVista Announces Multiple Tier1 Customers Adopting MVShield for Commercial Support of CentOS and Rocky Linux

    MontaVista® Software, LLC, a leader in commercial Embedded Linux® products and services, today announced that several Tier1 customers across the enterprise markets serviced by MontaVista, have selected MVShield because of its capabilities to offer Long-Term Support for CentOS with telecom grade features such as redundancy, high availability and high throughput with low latency.

  • Red Hat Bolsters Cloud-Native and Edge Portfolio

    Red Hat today at the KubeCon + CloudNativeCon North America conference unfurled a bevy of updates that promise to both make it easier to build and deploy applications on fleets of clusters based on its distribution of Kubernetes and manage the overall environment.

  • Software’s Big Skill-Up, Learning The Way To Cloud-Native

    In this regard, Red Hat is providing ways for cloud-native deployments to be executed more quickly and accurately. Red Hat Advanced Cluster Management for Kubernetes 2.4 provides ‘policy templating’ (a policy being the prescripted way data is managed in any given system) and zero-touch provisioning. Of particular use in edge i.e. Internet of Things (IoT) computing environments, Red Hat also here combines what the company calls ‘validated patterns for edge’ to reduce deployment complexity, save time and improve the accuracy of the cloud-native systems being developed.

  • Automotive transformation to software-defined vehicles: Red Hat point of view and synergies with state-of-the-art IT

    Building a dream car doesn’t just revolve around factors like horsepower and interior finishes anymore. The automotive industry is going through some big changes as the electric vehicle market revs up and edge computing extends new capabilities for vehicle connectivity.

    At Red Hat, we are working to enable a number of edge use cases—from telecommunications use cases with core network infrastructure for radio access networks to distributed computing for retail environments and manufacturing environments.

    During the "Automotive transformation to software-defined vehicles" Ask the Expert session at Red Hat Summit this year, we discussed the car as the ultimate edge server and the role of Red Hat and other open source contributors in this fast-evolving industry. This post will cover some of the highlights from the session.

  • Remote and hybrid work: 4 tips to ease onboarding

    Onboarding new team members has been a struggle for many companies that rapidly switched to remote work or hybrid work. As an IT leader, you know that business success depends on having reliable and talented colleagues working together, whether virtually or in person. So how do you overcome the remote onboarding challenge?

    Answering this question can be particularly difficult if yours is a "traditional" industry with a baked-in corporate culture. A company that’s been in the financial services industry for 100 years, for instance, is likely to have a tougher time revamping its onboarding processes than, say, a start-up that specializes in cloud services.

    That’s not corporate ageism; it’s a trend that's been seen time and time again – and it will, unfortunately, inhibit your ability to onboard talented developers and other technologists with a diversity of backgrounds and experience.

    The good news? Any organization, in any industry, can successfully “virtualize” its onboarding practices. In doing so, they invigorate their IT teams and add collaborative, innovative people.

More in Tux Machines

Security Leftovers

  • Linux Fixes Spectre V1 SWAPGS Mitigation After Being Partially Borked Since Last Year - Phoronix

    This week's set of "x86/urgent" changes for the Linux 5.16-rc4 kernel due out later today has some Spectre V1 fixes after kernel commits last year ended up partially messing things up around its SWAPGS handling. These fixes in turn will also likely be back-ported to relevant stable kernel series. Thanks to an Alibaba engineer, Lai Jiangshan, are some important fixes around the Spectre V1 SWAPGS mitigation that are landing today in the mainline kernel.

  • Reproducible Builds: Reproducible Builds in November 2021

    As a quick recap, whilst anyone may inspect the source code of free software for malicious flaws, almost all software is distributed to end users as pre-compiled binaries. The motivation behind the reproducible builds effort is therefore to ensure no flaws have been introduced during this compilation process by promising identical results are always generated from a given source, thus allowing multiple third-parties to come to a consensus on whether a build was compromised. If you are interested in contributing to our project, please visit our Contribute page on our website.

  • Reproducible Builds (diffoscope): diffoscope 195 released

    The diffoscope maintainers are pleased to announce the release of diffoscope version 195. This version includes the following changes:

    [ Chris Lamb ]
    * Don't use the runtime platform's native endianness when unpacking .pyc
      files to fix test failures on big-endian machines.
    

Linux 5.16-rc4

Fairly small rc4 this week. Three areas stand out in the diff: some
kvm fixes (and tests), network driver fixes, and the tegra SoC sound
fixes.

The rest is fairly spread out: drm fixes, some filesystem stuff,
various arch updates, and some smattering of random driver fixes.

Nothing looks all that scary, although I certainly hope the kvm side
will calm down.

                  Linus
Read more Also: Linux 5.16-rc4 Released - "Nothing Looks All That Scary"

EFF Argument in Patent Troll Case to Be Livestreamed on Monday

At 10 am Monday, FOSS folks and others interested in software patent litigation will have a chance to have a firsthand look at how our courts address patent cases. The case involves a “notorious patent troll,” according to Electronic Frontiers Foundation, that is trying to hide information from Apple, which it’s suing. “At a federal appeals court hearing that will be livestreamed, attorney Alexandra H. Moss, Executive Director at Public Interest Patent Law Institute, who is assisting EFF in the case, will argue that a judge’s order to unseal all documents and preserve public access in the case of Uniloc USA, Inc. v. Apple Inc. should be upheld,” EFF said in a statement on Thursday. “Uniloc is entitled to resolve its patent dispute in publicly-funded courts, Moss will argue, but it’s not entitled to do so secretly.” EFF said that this is the second time the plaintiff, Uniloc, has appealed an order to be more transparent in this case. Read more

Gnuastro 0.16 released

Dear all,

I am happy to announce the 16th official release of GNU Astronomy
Utilities (Gnuastro version 0.16).

Gnuastro is an official GNU package, consisting of various
command-line programs and library functions for the manipulation and
analysis of (astronomical) data. All the programs share the same basic
command-line user interface (modeled on GNU Coreutils). For the full
list of Gnuastro's library, programs, and a comprehensive general
tutorial (recommended place to start using Gnuastro), please see the
links below respectively:

https://www.gnu.org/s/gnuastro/manual/html_node/Gnuastro-library.html
https://www.gnu.org/s/gnuastro/manual/html_node/Gnuastro-programs-list.html
https://www.gnu.org/s/gnuastro/manual/html_node/General-program-usage-tutorial.html

For a complete review of the new/changed features in this release,
please see [1] below (also available in the 'NEWS' file within the
source code tarball).

Here is the compressed source and the GPG detached signature for this
release. To uncompress Lzip tarballs, see [2]. To check the validity
of the tarballs using the GPG detached signature (*.sig) see [3]:

  https://ftp.gnu.org/gnu/gnuastro/gnuastro-0.16.tar.lz    (3.7MB)
  https://ftp.gnu.org/gnu/gnuastro/gnuastro-0.16.tar.gz    (5.9MB)
  https://ftp.gnu.org/gnu/gnuastro/gnuastro-0.16.tar.gz.sig (833B)
  https://ftp.gnu.org/gnu/gnuastro/gnuastro-0.16.tar.lz.sig (833B)

Here are the SHA1 and SHA256 checksums (other ways to check if the
tarball you download is what we distributed). Just note that the
SHA256 checksum is base64 encoded, instead of the hexadecimal encoding
that most checksum tools default to.

fe1f84bf1be270f1a62091e9a5f89bb94b182154  gnuastro-0.16.tar.lz
B4hftfYuyc7x3I6aEJ2SQlkp6x7zOOrPz/bK2koGuR8  gnuastro-0.16.tar.lz
1ae00673648fe8db5630f1de9d70b49fadb42d7d  gnuastro-0.16.tar.gz
kMEdJbsFrRNxDLX4EXntgXNgikJv3/2LIEWGLV/e4i0  gnuastro-0.16.tar.gz

For this release, Pedram Ashofteh Ardakani, Natáli D. Anzanello,
Sepideh Eskandarlou, Raúl Infante-Sainz, Vladimir Markelov and Zahra
Sharbaf directly contributed to the source of Gnuastro, I am very
grateful to all of them. I should also thank Alejandro Serrano
Borlaff, Fernando Buitrago, Mark Calabretta, Zohreh Ghaffari, Giulia
Golini, Leslie Hunt, Raúl Infante-Sainz, Matthias Kluge, Juan Miro,
Juan Molina Tobar, Markus Schaney, Zahra Sharbaf, Vincenzo Testa,
Ignacio Trujillo and Aaron Watkins for their very good suggestions or
bug reports that have been implemented in Gnuastro 0.16.

If any of Gnuastro's programs or libraries are useful in your work,
please cite _and_ acknowledge them. For citation and acknowledgment
guidelines, run the relevant programs with a `--cite' option (it can
be different for different programs, so run it for all the programs
you use). Citations _and_ acknowledgments are vital for the continued
work on Gnuastro, so please don't forget to support us by doing so.

This tarball was bootstrapped (created) with the tools below. Note
that you don't need these to build Gnuastro from the tarball, these
are the tools that were used to make the tarball itself. They are only
mentioned here to be able to reproduce/recreate this tarball later.
  Texinfo 6.8
  Autoconf 2.71
  Automake 1.16.4
  Help2man 1.48.5
  ImageMagick 7.1.0-9
  Gnulib v0.1-4944-g7fc3219bc
  Autoconf archives v2021.02.19-29-g0fbee2a

The dependencies to build Gnuastro from this tarball on your system
are described here:
  https://www.gnu.org/s/gnuastro/manual/html_node/Dependencies.html

Best wishes,
Mohammad
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