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IBM/Red Hat Leftovers

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Red Hat
  • Reach your open source community with content marketing [Ed: IBM has totally lost direction; this is how they think of Free software...]

    Both startups and more established firms are increasingly turning to content marketing as a way of reaching prospective customers.

    However, corporate marketers often consider the open source software (OSS) community a challenge to reach. This article features ways your technology and content marketing teams can work together to target and reach the community around an OSS project your organization supports.

  • Why digital transformation demands a change in leadership mindset

    Recently a key retail executive forecast that their industry will change more in the next five years than it has in the past fifty. Another executive believes society will change more in the next fifty years than it has in the last three hundred. A recent headline declared that, “We are approaching the fastest, deepest, most consequential technological disruption in history”, and Ray Kurzweil, Google’s Director of Engineering and co-Founder of Singularity University, has said that there will be fourteen internet size revolutions in the next decade. Whichever way you look at it, things are shifting… fast.

    When you speak with the visionaries and entrepreneurs actually building the solutions of tomorrow, from on-demand retail to vertical farms, and ask how far into this new era we are, almost universally the reply is: “only one percent”. Imagine then, where we will be ten years from now? How about 50?

    Major industries, from medicine to energy to travel to entertainment, are radically transforming, putting pressure on others such as manufacturing, construction, transportation, finance, education…frankly, all of it. What an extraordinary opportunity this presents.

  • DevSecOps lessons learned during a pandemic | The Enterprisers Project

    As we’ve seen over the past year and a half, the pandemic has accelerated digital transformation and forever changed workplace culture. Increased reliance on digital tools has elevated the value of DevSecOps, as enterprises of all sizes and across all industries realize the importance of automating and integrating security at every phase of the software development lifecycle – from initial design through integration, testing, deployment, and product delivery.

    My engineering team was no exception to this shift – we had to quickly prepare to build a new Virtana SaaS platform and deliver several new modules, all while working remotely.

    Here I’ll share some observations, pain points, and lessons learned to help others intelligently embrace DevSecOps best practices within their teams.

More in Tux Machines

LXer: Laptop Dual Boot Project Part 2

I know some of you are wondering why go through all of this when I could just install a Linux distro along side of windows and be done with it? One reason was I had to pay it off. A financed $550 laptop takes a little while to pay off. I didn't want to change the machine any while I owed money on it. And the idea of messing with a bone stock laptop using Linux sounded fun. The good thing now is that I have paid it off so it's all mine to do whatever I want with. So, for me it came down to PCLOS, Mint, SUSE or Ubuntu to install to my laptop. I tried them all 'live' from USB drives and a couple of them using VirtualBox. They are all good distros and there are many articles on why one or the other is good or better for you but for me, it came down to PCLinuxOS or Mint. Having come from Windows originally I am most comfortable with a "Windows like" environment. I think both PCLOS and Mint are two versions of that I like best. I like Mint mire but what has drawn me to PCLOS is that it is the only Linux I have tried in that the backlight on my keyboard works. It may sound dumb but it makes it easier for me being able to see the keys no matter the lighting situation I'm in. I tried to install PCLinuxOS onto my laptop and I got a "can't call method on first_usable_sector unblessed reference" error at the very beginning of the install process. I couldn't get around it and aborted the install. Time to do some research. Come to find out I have a AHCI-RAID problem. I got into the BIOS and changed the SATA configuration from RAID to AHCI but in rebooting, it wouldn't boot. So I went back into my BIOS and wrote down the configuration in the SATA settings. It says I am running the "Intel RST Premium with Intel Optane System Acceleration". I have been looking that up but haven't found much...much I understand that is. More Googling is required. I got back into the boot menu and changed the SATA config back to Intel's RAID setting and it re-booted just fine. It seems that for the moment I am able to run Linux from USB 'live' and under VirtualBox but I am unable to install it to the HD. For those who don't know the big difference AHCI and Raid , it is how they store the data to the hard drive. I'll use a sink with water filling it for the metaphor. RAID 1 offers redundancy through mirroring, i.e., data is written identically to two drives. Think of two sinks with the same water in them. RAID 0 offers no redundancy and instead uses striping, i.e., data is split across all the drives. think of two sinks with the water split between them. Half of the data goes into one drive and the other half into another drive. This means RAID 0 offers no fault tolerance; if the drives fails, the RAID unit fails. Read more

Help the FSF tech team maintain email services in freedom

The Free Software Foundation's (FSF) tech team is a small but dedicated team of three staff. With your support, and with the help of volunteers and interns, we run hundreds of services on a few dozen physical machines in four data centers. We are very excited about some of the initiatives we are working on, like deploying our upcoming forge site and other new systems, expanding our physical server deployments, and a further refresh of fsf.org. In parallel, the tech team is always working to better maintain, understand, and document our existing systems. Mastering those keeps vital systems running smoothly and lays the groundwork for future improvements. Email is a key service we provide. Besides it being one of the FSF campaigns and licensing teams' most important ways of communicating, we also support thousands of mailing lists for other free software projects, which send millions of emails per year. Free software is extremely capable in all aspects of email, and there continue to be innovative advancements in free software email programs that we are excited to explore and adopt. Read more

Android Leftovers

What Is OpenBSD? Everything You Need to Know

OpenBSD is no doubt one of the most secure operating systems on the internet. Here's what you need to know about it. Linux fans love to tout their system's security, but for one group of BSD developers, it doesn't go far enough. One version of BSD, OpenBSD, claims to be one of the most secure operating systems around. Does it live up to the hype? Let's find out. Read more