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LibreOffice 7.2.2 Community Released with 68 Bug Fixes, Update Now

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The LibreOffice 7.2 office suite was released in mid-August 2021 with many new features and improvements for all of its core components, including Writer, Calc, Impress & Draw, Math, and Chart, native support for Apple M1 machines, as well as improved interoperability with the MS Office document formats.

LibreOffice 7.2.2 is here about a month after the LibreOffice 7.2.1 point release to fix even more bugs and security issues. According to the RC1 and RC2 changelogs, there are a total of 68 bug fixes, so you should update your installations as soon as possible.

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The Document Foundation announces LibreOffice 7.2.2 Community

  • The Document Foundation announces LibreOffice 7.2.2 Community

    The Document Foundation announces LibreOffice 7.2.2 Community, the second minor release of the LibreOffice 7.2 family targeted at technology enthusiasts and power users, which is available for download from https://www.libreoffice.org/download/. This version includes 68 bug fixes and improvements to document compatibility.

    LibreOffice 7.2.1 Community is also available for Apple Silicon from this link: https://download.documentfoundation.org/libreoffice/stable/7.2.2/mac/aarch64/.

    For enterprise-class deployments, TDF strongly recommends the LibreOffice Enterprise family of applications from ecosystem partners, with long-term support options, professional assistance, custom features and Service Level Agreements: https://www.libreoffice.org/download/libreoffice-in-business/.

    LibreOffice Community and the LibreOffice Enterprise family of products are based on the LibreOffice Technology platform, the result of years of development efforts with the objective of providing a state of the art office suite not only for the desktop but also for mobile and the cloud.

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