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Further adventures with Feisty Fawn

Filed under
Ubuntu

It's difficult to walk away from an experiment with software - especially when you know that most of the problems are resolvable. It's probably something to do with one's ego. But never mind.

I returned to my experiments with Feisty Fawn early this morning. To recap a bit, after installing it on my PC yesterday, I got a message saying ""GRUB loading, please wait... Error 18."

This time, before beginning the installation, I changed the BIOS setting for the hard drive from LBA to auto, this being one of the suggestions I saw on a mailing list. This did no good, so the next time I partitioned the hard drive manually, allocating a small boot partition as the first slice. I left it to install while I went to bed.

After I woke up, I rebooted the PC and found I had a working installation. But my rejoicing was shortlived.

Full Story.



Also:

I spent the day upgrading my new Xubuntu 6.10 (Edgy) installation to Xubuntu 7.04 (Feisty), and since Xubuntu is derived from Ubuntu, far and away the most popular Linux distribution for the desktop, I expected -- and still expect -- a lot more from it.

With Xubuntu, I hooked up a 14.4 GB hard drive and a 32x CD-RW drive. And by the time I installed Xubuntu, I expected to get even more real work done. This time I seek to up the ante, doing work for Dailynews.com, which entails working with larger photo files (downloaded from services such as GettyImages.com and WireImage.com, although the latter offers a choice of smaller images to begin with).

Wrestling with Xubuntu Feisty.


And:

I recently did a switch of Windows to Ubuntu and then upgraded to Fiesty Fawn (7.04) earlier this week. I must say, Ubuntu rocks but has it’s drawbacks. I hate to give Windows any credit when it comes to better performance, but unfortunately out of the box, a Windows XP system for example does perform faster than a default install of Ubuntu. That does not mean Ubuntu cannot be tweaked to boost performance to surpass Windows.

We’ve compiled a list of resources that can be used to improve performance on your Ubuntu operating system.

Ubuntu Performance Guides.


Others:

* Kubuntu 7.04: Putting up a real fight against Windows Vista.

* Ubuntu Feisty Fawn 7.04

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