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Variscite and Sequitur Labs new partnership accelerates the development of reliable and secure IoT products

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Tel Aviv, September 29, 2021, Variscite, a leading worldwide System on Module vendor in the embedded market, announced a new partnership with Sequitur Labs, a leading security company providing a complete chip-to-cloud software solution for secure device design, manufacturing, and lifecycle management.
The collaboration aims to deliver a complete security solution for customers using Variscite's i.MX8 based System on Module (SoM) for IoT and Artificial Intelligence (AI) applications.

Billions of internet devices are expected to be online in the next few years, following an increased demand for smart products based on AI at the network edge. However, the IoT market is not secure – about half of IoT vendors have experienced a security breach at least once. Without the right security framework, each connected device is a target for malicious attacks.

Sequitur's EmSPARK™ Security Suite and EmPOWER™ cloud services help IoT vendors resolve these security issues, starting from the early design stage throughout the product lifecycle. Combined with Variscite's trusted SoM solutions, customers can focus their efforts on developing and releasing secure IoT products quickly and at low risk.

"With 75 billion devices expected to be online by 2025, device vendors and their customers need to ensure that their products are safe and secure," said Philip Attfield, Co-founder and CEO of Sequitur Labs. "IoT security is no longer optional – whether it's protecting critical IP on the device or securing the transmission of firmware updates through an internet connection".

"The partnership with Sequitur Labs allows Variscite to extend its ecosystem and overall system solution around our SoM solutions for the rapidly growing embedded IoT products trend" said Ofer Austerlitz, VP Business Development and Sales at Variscite. "

Availability
Sequitur's platform is already fully integrated with Variscite's i.MX 8M Plus modules, the DART-MX8M-PLUS and VAR-SOM-MX8M-PLUS. The modules are based on a 1.8GHz Quad Cortex™-A53 NXP's i.MX 8M Plus processor with 800MHz Cortex™-M7 Real-time co-processor and integrate dedicated Artificial Intelligence / Machine Learning (AI/ML) capabilities. Both are members of Variscite's Pin2Pin products families along with additional modules based on the entire i.MX 8 series and popular i.MX 6 platforms. The broad pin-compatibility options allow Variscite's customers to enjoy ultimate scalability and extended longevity, as well as reduced development time, costs, and risks.
Sequitur's support in additional i.MX 8 and i.MX 6 System on Modules is already in process.

Variscite
For almost two decades, Variscite is developing and manufacturing high-quality System-on-Module solutions, providing a vast ARM-based SoM portfolio with a wide range of configuration options and Pin2Pin modules that covers an entire embedded products and applications range; from entry-level to high-performance solutions.

Variscite's in-house production fully complies with the strict medical ISO13485 and ISO9001 standards. Along with the company's ongoing online documentation and personal support as well as the generous longevity, the company's customers are enjoying consistent, reliable products and services starting from the earliest development stages throughout the end product life-cycle.

For more information, contact Variscite's by email at sales@variscite.com, or via www.variscite.com/contact-us/

Sequitur Labs
Sequitur Labs delivers a complete chip-to-cloud solution for secure device design, manufacturing, and lifecycle management. The Sequitur Labs Security Platform offers two products:
EmSPARK™ Security Suite: Sequitur Labs' EmSPARK™ Security Suite a collection of firmware, integration tools, and APIs that provide complete chip-to-cloud security for MPU's.
EmPOWER™ is a SaaS solution that provides the essential cloud services needed to secure, update, and manage intelligent edge devices.

For more information, contact Sequitur Labs by email info@sequiturlabs.com
https://www.sequiturlabs.com/emspark-for-variscite/

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