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GNU Core Utilities 9.0

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  • Subject: coreutils-9.0 released [stable]
    This is to announce coreutils-9.0, a stable release.
    
    This is a new major release, with these significant changes:
      - cp has changed how it handles data
        - enables CoW by default (through FICLONE ioctl),
        - uses copy offload where available (through copy_file_range),
        - detects holes differently (though SEEK_HOLE)
        - This also applies to mv and install.
    
      - utilities are more tuned to the hardware available
        - wc uses avx2 instructions to count lines
        - cksum uses pclmul instructions for --algorithm=crc
    
      - More amalgamation of utilities
        - cksum now supports the -a option to select any digest.
        - This is the preferred interface, rather than sha*sum etc.
        - This is similar to the amalgamation of encoding utilities
          introduced in the basenc command in v8.31.
    See the NEWS below for more details.
    
    Thanks to everyone who has contributed!
    There have been 257 commits by 25 people in the 81 weeks since 8.32
      Andreas Schwab (1)              KOBAYASHI Takashi (2)
      Arman Absalan (1)               Kamil Dudka (4)
      Assaf Gordon (1)                Kristoffer Brånemyr (3)
      Ben Pfaff (1)                   Nikolay Nechaev (1)
      Benno Schulenberg (1)           Nishant Nayan (1)
      Bernhard Voelker (17)           Paul Eggert (97)
      Carl Edquist (2)                Pádraig Brady (110)
      Emanuele Giacomelli (1)         Tianjia Zhang (1)
      Erik Auerswald (1)              Tim Gates (1)
      Grigorii Sokolik (2)            Tobias Stoeckmann (1)
      Jason Kim (1)                   Zorro Lang (1)
      Jim Meyering (7)                nl6720 (1)
      Justin Tracey (1)
    
    Pádraig [on behalf of the coreutils maintainers]
    
    ==================================================================
    
    Here is the GNU coreutils home page:
       https://gnu.org/software/coreutils/
    
    For a summary of changes and contributors, see:
       https://git.sv.gnu.org/gitweb/?p=coreutils.git;a=shortlog;h=v9.0
    or run this command from a git-cloned coreutils directory:
       git shortlog v8.32..v9.0
    
    To summarize the 1615 gnulib-related changes, run these commands
    from a git-cloned coreutils directory:
       git checkout v9.0
       git submodule summary v8.32
    
    ==================================================================
    
    
    Here are the compressed sources:
      https://ftp.gnu.org/gnu/coreutils/coreutils-9.0.tar.gz   (14MB)
      https://ftp.gnu.org/gnu/coreutils/coreutils-9.0.tar.xz   (5.4MB)
    
    Here are the GPG detached signatures[*]:
      https://ftp.gnu.org/gnu/coreutils/coreutils-9.0.tar.gz.sig
      https://ftp.gnu.org/gnu/coreutils/coreutils-9.0.tar.xz.sig
    
    Use a mirror for higher download bandwidth:
      https://www.gnu.org/order/ftp.html
    
    Here are the SHA1 and SHA256 checksums:
    
    027a318930f295cb5bbc0dd06fb47a3b8552fc80  coreutils-9.0.tar.gz
    b9TriKUVAEl3/HLX9HtAYgQJzEHfrwBBn90b4XZjxDQ  coreutils-9.0.tar.gz
    e2623469f37259d4a89ced5f91af5eaf0ab8792d  coreutils-9.0.tar.xz
    zjCs30pBvFuzDdlV6eqnX6IWtOPesIiJ7TJDPHs7l84  coreutils-9.0.tar.xz
    
    The SHA256 checksum is base64 encoded, instead of the
    hexadecimal encoding that most checksum tools default to.
    
    [*] Use a .sig file to verify that the corresponding file (without the
    .sig suffix) is intact.  First, be sure to download both the .sig file
    and the corresponding tarball.  Then, run a command like this:
    
      gpg --verify coreutils-9.0.tar.gz.sig
    
    If that command fails because you don't have the required public key,
    then run this command to import it:
    
      gpg --keyserver keys.gnupg.net --recv-keys DF6FD971306037D9
    
    and rerun the 'gpg --verify' command.
    
    This release was bootstrapped with the following tools:
      Autoconf 2.71
      Automake 1.16.4
      Gnulib v0.1-4937-g9aca7b673
      Bison 3.7.4
    
  • coreutils-9.0 released

    The GNU Core Utilities (coreutils) has announced the release of version 9.0 of "the basic file, shell and text manipulation utilities" used by the GNU operating system and various Linux distributions. In the year and a half or so since the last major release (8.32), various new features were added, including...

GNU Coreutils 9.0: cp Now Enables CoW By Default + Copy Offload

  • GNU Coreutils 9.0: cp Now Enables CoW By Default + Copy Offload, wc Now Uses AVX2

    Coreutils 9.0 is now available and it's a significant update to this collection of common open-source utilities found on effectively all Linux systems.

    First up, the widely-used cp utility for copying files/directories has some notable changes. With Coreutils 9.0, cp now enables copy-on-write (CoW) support by default using the FICLONE ioctl. Additionally, cp now uses copy-offload where possible by means of the copy_file_range system call. The cp command also now detects holes differently, among other changes. These cp changes also apply to the mv and install utilities too.

GNU Coreutils 9.0 Are Here in the Year and a Half

  • GNU Coreutils 9.0 Are Here in the Year and a Half After the Previous v8.32

    Core utilities are the basic, fundamental tools of a GNU/Linux system. Coreutils 9.0 brings with it some important improvements.

    [...]

    It’s easy to understand how important they are for each Linux system, giving the following example.

    When Linus Torvalds first wrote and compiled the Linux kernel, he needed a set of very basic system utilities to even begin to perform marginally useful work. The kernel does not provide commands themselves or any type of command shell such as bash. It is useless by itself. So Linus used the freely available GNU Core Utilities and recompiled them for Linux. This gave him a complete operating system that we know today as Linux.

    For those of you who don’t know, previously these utilities were offered as three individual sets of GNU utilities named Fileutils, Shellutils, and Textutils. In September 2002, those three have been combined into a single set of utilities called Coreutils.

    Here you can find the list of commands from the GNU Coreutils 9.0 for Linux/Unix environments.

GNU Core Utilities 9.0: Slight improvements for most free system

  • GNU Core Utilities 9.0: Slight improvements for most free systems

    The developers around Pádraig “pixelbeat” Brady have released version 9 of the GNU Core Utilities. Every GNU / Linux user at some point stumbles across terminal commands like ls, cat, cp, rm and dd. These basic commands of any Unix or Unix-like system are standardized and summarized in the GNU Core Utilities.

    The individual programs, which are emphasized in accordance with the Unix philosophy, have been around for over 30 years (at that time still file, sh and text utils, for 20 years coreutils) – one would think that they have matured so slowly and without errors . Compared to the previous version, the GNU Core Utilities 8.32 from March 2020, around half of the changes concern pure error corrections, only the other half are changes in behavior, new functions and other improvements.

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