Language Selection

English French German Italian Portuguese Spanish

Etch-A-Sketch to Be on U.K. Cell Phones

Filed under
Sci/Tech

For doodlers who can't get enough etching and sketching at home, Etch-A-Sketch is coming to a cell phone.

The nearly 50-year-old classic toy, adapted for the mobile phone by a company named In-Fusio, is being introduced in Britain on a wide array of handsets by the cellular carrier Orange.

The cellular version can't replicate the look and feel of the original red-and-rectangular plastic toy, which is still produced by Ohio Art Co. And users will have to settle for a key pad rather than white knobs. But there is one key advantage: For the first time, In-Fusio said, doodlers will be able to save their drawings - up to three in the phone's memory.

The new mobile edition is the second digital reincarnation of Etch-A-Sketch. Last year, Ohio Arts introduced a video game in which doodlers use a controller to draw on a television screen.
The traditional Etch-A-Sketch works by turning two knobs to move a stylus up, down and diagonally along the inside of the plastic screen, etching lines through a coating of metallic powder.

On the cellular version, users move the virtual "stylus" around the phone's screen by pressing the number pad or directional arrows.

One key distinction that Etch-A-Sketch aficionados might mourn is that erasing a cellular sketch does not involve the vigorous shaking needed to recoat the real toy's screen with powder. But In-Fusio has devised an alternative: When a user presses the "0" key to erase a drawing, the phone also vibrates.

Associated Press

More in Tux Machines

World’s smallest i.MX6 module has onboard WiFi, eMMC

Variscite unveiled a 50 x 20mm “DART-MX6″ module that runs Linux or Android on the Freescale i.MX6, with up to 64GB eMMC flash and -40 to 85°C support. Variscite’s claim that the 50 x 20mm DART-MX6 is the world’s smallest computer-on-module based on Freescale’s i.MX6 system-on-chip appears to be a valid one. It beats the smallest ones we’ve seen to date: TechNexion’s 40 x 36mm PICO-IMX6, and Solid-Run’s 47 x 30mm microSOM i4. It’s also just a hair larger than Variscite’s own 52 x 17mm DART-4460, which is based on a dual-core TI OMAP4460 SoC, and Gumstix’s slightly larger 58 x 17mm Overo modules, which use TI Sitara AM37xx SoCs. Read more

BQ Aquaris E4.5 Ubuntu Edition review

The BQ Aquaris e4.5 Ubuntu Edition is not the debut Canonical must have envisaged for Ubuntu Phone, in the early days of the platform’s development. It’s a perfectly functional smartphone for the most part, and we like the concept of scopes, but the hardware is humdrum, performance is sluggish, and the software running on it is rough and ready, and full of holes. We’ll be tracking the progress of Ubuntu Phone with interest – it surely must get better than this – but this first device is one to write off to experience. Read more