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Open Hardware: TVMosaic, Arduino, and Raspberry Pi

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Hardware
  • TVMosaic CE (Community Edition) server released as open source by DVBLogic - CNX Software

    TVMosaic (formerly DVBLink) TV/PVR-server application has been released as a cross-platform open-source software, following the closure of DVBLink business last year.

    It used to be a commercial solution with support for digital TV tuners, live TV watching, PVR functions, DLNA, and more, and there was also a PVR client for Kodi that was part of the list of support PVR clients like TvHeadEnd.

  • Optical Theremin Makes Eerie Audio with Few Parts

    [Fearless Night]’s optical theremin project takes advantage of the kind of highly-integrated parts that are available to the modern hacker and hobbyist in all the right ways. The result is a compact instrument with software that can be modified using the Arduino IDE to take it places the original Theremin design could never go.

  • We’d Like, Totally Carry This Retro Boombox Cyberdeck on Our Shoulder

    Cyberdeck. For those of a certain age, the ‘deck’ part conjures visions of tape decks, be they cassette, 8-track, or quarter-inch, and we seriously have to wonder why haven’t seen this type of build before. But here we are, thanks to [bongoplayingmonkey]’s Sanyo Cyberdeck, a truly retro machine built into a cool old boombox.

  • Dynamicland Makes The Whole Building The Computer | Hackaday

    Dynamicland is an instantiation of a Realtalk ecosystem, deployed into a whole building. Tables are used as computing surfaces, with physical objects such as pieces of paper, notebooks, anything which can be read by one of the overhead cameras, becoming the program listing, as well as the user interface. The camera is associated with a projector, with the actual hardware hooked into so-called ‘Realboxes’ which are Linux machines running the Realtalk software. Separate Realboxes (and other hardware such as a Raspberry Pi, running Realtalk) are all federated together using the Realtalk protocol, which allows communication from hardware in the ceiling, to any on the desk, and also to other desks and computing surfaces.