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today's leftovers

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  • Linux 5.15 Is Now Slightly Less Broken For The DEC Alpha "Jensen" - Phoronix

    One has to wonder how much longer the Linux kernel will keep around some very old and known to be borked hardware support but at least for now the DECpc AXP 150 "Jensen" platform support is sticking around and with Linux 5.15 is no longer marked as "broken" outright.

    The past four years the Linux kernel Kconfig for the DEC Alpha Jensen platform has marked it as "BROKEN" since it was known to not even compile due to a build error... With Linux 5.15 that Jensen system code now has its four lines of moved around code so it can at least build correctly. So with a change merged on Saturday Linux 5.15 no longer calls Jensen as "BROKEN" outright.

  • At least from an outside perspective, Ubuntu is Canonical's thing

    It's true that Ubuntu has a community of people who contribute to it despite Canonical not paying them for their time and work. But this community doesn't get to make real decisions on anything that Canonical cares about, any more than the CentOS (community) board gets to overrule IBM's views on how CentOS should operate. If and when Canonical says 'Ubuntu is doing X' (or 'not doing X'), that's what happens. In a way, there's nothing particularly nefarious about this in the case of Ubuntu; Canonical founded it and has always paid for it and run it, and we've just enjoyed the ride.

  • Technology Roadmap

    Much like any other organization navigating the future during very uncertain times, the FreeBSD Foundation team spent the last year increasingly focused on how best to support its mission and goal – how best to support the FreeBSD Project. We held strategy sessions with the Foundation Board and FreeBSD Core team, reviewed the results of the FreeBSD core team’s user and developer surveys, and held conversations with developers, users and other members of the FreeBSD community to determine where to focus our efforts. The overall goal is to expand and enhance the efforts of the technology team.

    The beginnings of this effort can be seen in the FreeBSD Quarterly Status Reports for the first half of the year. One example is the sponsored Linuxulator Compatibility Improvements project that included modernizing the code base to support popular client-facing and server related Linux applications. You can read more about his work at https://freebsdfoundation.org/project/targeted-linuxulator-compatibility-improvements/.

  • China to push RISC-V to global prominence – but maybe into a corner, too, says analyst

    Attempts to restrict technology transfer to China could see the RISC-V architecture become more prominent, but also reduce the diversity of development around the platform.

    So says analyst firm Counterpoint Research, which on Monday noted that Arm today owns more than a third of the market for semiconductor IP and is well placed as that market enjoys 11 per cent compound annual growth to reach $8.6bn per year by 2025.

    But Arm won't have things entirely its own way.

    "The rise of RISC-V cannot be ignored," Counterpoint stated. "In fact, RISC-V is now a rising star in the industry, largely due to its open-source advantage, better power consumption performance promise [and] reliable security functions."

  • New release of SweRVolf RISC-V SoC project aims for lower barrier to entry

    The SweRVolf project, a fully open system-on-chip designed as a reference platform for Western Digital's RISC-V SweRV cores, has announced a major new release promising lower barriers to entry for those looking to experiment.

    "Western Digital released the first of the SweRV cores, EH1, in 2018," Olof Kindgren, senior digital design engineer at Qamcom and director at the Free and Open Source Silicon (FOSSi) Foundation, told The Register.

    "While it was an amazing core, and the fastest 32-bit RISC-V core at least at that time, they were new to the world of open-source silicon and asked me what they should do to make it easier for others to pick it up.

  • Mobile Linux distributions

    This is a list of GNU/Linux distributions designed to run on smartphones. While many support phones designed to run a mainline Linux kernel including the PinePhone and Librem 5, there are others that are able to run on phones that originally shipped with Android thanks to tools like Halium that allow them to use Linux kernels provided by makers of those Android phones.

    Keep in mind that many of the operating systems listed below operating systems are a work in progress and may not be as stable or speedy as Android, may not support all of a phone’s hardware, and may not be able to run as many mobile-friendly applications. But most have at least a working web browser, which enables you to run web applications. Some allow you to run Android apps in a container thanks to tools like Anbox. And many will let you run desktop Linux applications, even if they don’t scale well to phone-sized screens. If you connect a keyboard, mouse, and display, you can even use your phone as a tiny desktop computer.

  • Huawei Launches Industrial Operating System for Coal Mines - Caixin Global

    HarmonyOS-based software replaces grab bag of Linux, Unix and Windows systems and promises greater efficiency and safety in mining

  • Oracle to PostgreSQL? 6 Reasons to Make Your Open Source Migration

    Now with nearly three-decades of maturity, the post-object relational database system PostgreSQL is particularly emblematic of an enterprise-wide trend: proven open source data technologies – in their pure open source versions – are increasingly replacing expensive and inflexible proprietary solutions.

    Postgres offers some especially enticing advantages for enterprises looking to trim (if not downright slash) costs without impacting database performance. Here’s a half-dozen reasons enterprises should consider the fully open source version of Postgres as a more-than-capable Oracle replacement.

  • Creating Successful R User Groups in Abuja, Nigeria

    Bilikisu Aderinto, Founder/Organizer of the Abuja R User Group and R-Ladies Abuja, talks about the lack of R User groups in her area, and her desire to start one, leading to a large increase in members in Abuja. She talks about the issues with income disparity and how it affected lockdown attendance for the group. She also talks about training others to increase their knowledge base in the area.

More in Tux Machines

Microsoft's very bad year for security: A timeline

So far, 2021 has proved to be somewhat of a security annus horribilis for tech giant Microsoft, with numerous vulnerabilities impacting several of its leading services, including Active Directory, Exchange, and Azure. Microsoft is no stranger to being targeted by attackers seeking to exploit known and zero-day vulnerabilities, but the rate and scale of the incidents it has faced since early March has put the tech giant on its back foot for at least a moment or two. What follows is a timeline of the significant security events that have afflicted Microsoft in 2021, why it remains susceptible to serious vulnerabilities and attacks, and an assessment of its response according to experts from across the cybersecurity sector. Read more

Android Leftovers

Best Linux distro for power users in 2021

The Linux power user is a celebrated breed, and one that does not simply burst fully-formed from the earth. All newbies must toil long and hard with their Linux installations before they can describe themselves as one. At the very least, the power user will have a great degree of skill concerning all things Linux, whether it's the kernel, Bash or package management systems – and they won’t be afraid to get their hands dirty in the name of configuring the system. It seems, in many ways, that power users are a dying breed. Almost all modern Linux distributions require little effort to get up and running, or to install new software or configure basic functionality. By definition, no power user will want to run any of these distros. This is why, despite their popularity, the likes of Ubuntu and Mint are not featured here. On the other hand, control and flexibility are the hallmark of any distro meant for power users. The ones in this feature are user-driven, not guided. This gives them much greater adaptability, as well as allowing them to perform a diverse range of tasks. Read more

Devices: Simply NUC, Pine64, Arduino

  • Ubuntu-ready Ryzen V2000 mini-PC starts at $639

    Simply NUC has launched a $639-and-up “Cypress” mini-PC with AMD’s Ryzen V2000 plus 2.5GbE, 2x HDMI, 2x DP-ready Type-C, 3x USB 3.2 Gen2, and a 128GB SSD for one of the 2x M.2 slots. Simply NUC (or SimplyNUC) has launched a Cypress Long Life Mini mini-PC, named for its 7-year supply guarantee. The system offers pre-installed Ubuntu or Win 10 running on AMD’s 7nm, octa- and hexa-core Ryzen Embedded V2000. Pricing starts at $639 for a Cypress LLM2v5Cy SKU with the hexa-core, 2.1GHz/3.95GHz V2516, $689 for the LLM2v6CY with the hexa-core, 3.0GHz/3.95GHz V2546, and $829 for the LLM2v8CY with the top-of-the-line, octa-core 2.9GHz/4.25GHz V2748. All these prices include 4GB RAM, a 128GB SSD, 1-year support, and either no OS or pre-installed Ubuntu.

  • Build A Dog Ball Launcher That Kinda Looks Like A Dog | Hackaday

    The design is straightforward. The 3D printed housing features a large funnel into which a ball can be dropped. A servo then holds the ball while a pair of rollers are spun up by brushed DC motors. After two seconds, the servo releases the ball towards the rollers which launch the ball out of the machine. A Raspberry Pi Pico runs the show, controlling the timing of the ball launch and varying the motor speed to change the distance the ball is launched on each firing.

  • Arm adds virtual testing platform for Corstone Cortex-A and -M ref designs

    Arm has launched an “Arm Total Solutions for IoT” initiative that combines its Cortex-A- and -M based Corstone SoC reference designs with a new “Arm Virtual Hardware Targets” platform for virtual, cloud-based testing. In 2018, Arm launched an Arm Corstone subsystem product line comprising prevalidated SoC reference designs that combine its core IP with security, debug, memory subsystems, and in some cases, NPUs. Now, Arm has expanded Arm Corstone with a cloud-based Arm Virtual Hardware Targets testing and development platform aimed at IoT. Together with a new Project Centauri ecosystem initiative for Cortex-M developers, the programs are wrapped up into an “Arm Total Solutions for IoT” umbrella platform.

  • 248: PinePhone Pro: Exclusive Interview with Pine64

    This week’s episode of Destination Linux, we’re being joined by Lukasz Ericenski of Pine64 for an Exclusive Interview about the new PinePhone Pro! Then we’re going to talk about NTFS improvements coming to the Linux kernel. Plus we’ve also got our famous tips, tricks and software picks. All of this and so much more this week on Destination Linux. So whether you’re brand new to Linux and open source or a guru of sudo. This is the podcast for you.

  • Amazon offered me half of what I paid for my Galaxy S20 FE 5G. The phone is so awful that I’m considering it. – BaronHK's Rants

    I’m considering a Pine Phone Pro. My spouse laughed at me when I said it runs GNU/Linux and lets you do whatever you want. It sounds like the anti-iPhone to me. No crAPPs. No vendor lock-in. No freemium junk. But Samsung has been going downhill for years. Now, they don’t even want to talk to you unless you have thousands of dollars for a phone that will be obsolete or broken in a matter of 24-36 months (the Z series). The Pine Phone Pro is going to be $399 and Amazon is offering me a $200 gift card for this Galaxy phone. Which is half of what I paid for it last year, but I’m considering it. The stupid thing barely even works at all since T-Mobile bought Sprint and put the T-Mobile Network Experience SIM card in it. The stupid thing malfunctions the worst when I have 5G turned on, but it’s not great in LTE mode either. When it can get a network signal, the piece of trash is either beeping at me because it’s Samsung wanting me to agree to a new EULA or use Microsoft products that are also trash that I don’t want. (With NSA backdoors.) In the past 5 years, Samsung phones have gone from a couple of crapplets, just disable them, whatever, to an entire phone screaming at you that you MUST use Microsoft products.

  • Arduino Brings USB Mouse to Homebrew computer

    When building your own homebrew computer, everything is a challenge. Ultimately, that’s kind of the point. If you didn’t want to really get your hands dirty with the nuts and bolts of the thing, you wouldn’t have built it in the first place. For example, take the lengths to which [rehsd] was willing to go in order to support standard USB mice on their 6502 machine.