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Ubuntu and Sun vs. Red Hat and JBoss?

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In chess, there is a tactical motif called an x-ray. In it, the effect of an attacking piece is felt primarily not by the piece that's actively being attacked, but by the piece that is shielded from the direct attack by the attacked piece.

In the release of Ubuntu 7.04, with its optional Sun Java application server stack, the actively attacked piece is Red Hat Enterprise Linux, but JBoss is the real target.

Stephen O'Grady, a software industry analyst for RedMonk, describes the packing of Sun's open-source JEE (Java Enterprise Edition) 5 GlassFish application server, the Java SE Development Kit 6, Java DB 10.2, the Sun-supported version of the Apache Derby relational database manager, and the NetBeans IDE (integrated development environment) 5.5. as "a solid deal from a Sun perspective."

"I've argued for some time now that the Debian/Ubuntu/etc. non-commercial ecosystem is collectively larger than either the Red Hat or SUSE versions, and Ubuntu is obviously phenomenally popular in its own right, so this is an excellent channel opportunity," said O'Grady.

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