Language Selection

English French German Italian Portuguese Spanish

The Laptop Crusade

Filed under
OLPC

Within the next 12 months, as many as 10 million laptop computers will be distributed to children in Argentina, Brazil, Libya, Nigeria, Pakistan, Rwanda, and Uruguay. Countless youngsters who live in remote villages, perhaps without electricity, who may not have access to clean water or health care, will suddenly have computing power pretty close to that of businesspeople and college students.

It's one of the biggest nonprofit technology-based projects in a decade, and yet it's only the first phase of a program that seeks to put a staggering 100 million laptops into the hands of developing-world schoolchildren in the next couple of years, at a cost of at least US $10 billion. By any standard, the numbers are enormous: 100 million laptops is double the number produced annually throughout the world today. Simply meeting that target would almost surely cause global shortages of liquid-crystal displays and other key components.

The initiative, known as the One Laptop Per Child (OLPC) project, is the brainchild of Nicholas Negroponte, the founder of MIT's Media Lab, who announced the project at the World Economic Forum in Davos, Switzerland, in 2005. Hardly anyone questions the worthiness of the project's goals, but just about everything else about it has been fair game.

Full Story.

More in Tux Machines

Slackware Live Edition – on its way to 1.0?

Last week the second Beta of the upcoming Slackware 14.2 was released. My goal was to have a new Beta of my liveslak ready by that time, so that I could provide new ISO images to test the Slackware Beta2 on a live medium. Unfortunately, there was an attack of the flu in my team at work and things got a bit busier than usual. There was a plus side to this: some last moment bug fixes which could be applied to my scripts – the result of having more evenings available to test. Therefore the new release is not labeled “0.5.0” but “0.5.1” Read more

Leftovers: KDE

  • Cantor migrating to Phabricator: which tools our contributors must to use
    Projects and software developed by KDE community are going to migrate for a new tool to manage our code, commits, reviews, tasks, and more. This tool is Phabricator and you can visit the instance for KDE projects in this address. Since November 2015 we are migrating Cantor to Phabricator. After our first successful review code some days ago, I decided to write a post about which tools our contributors must to use while the migration process is not finished.
  • Kdenlive's sprint report
    Last week-end, Vincent and me met in Lausanne for a Kdenlive sprint. One of our goal was to merge Gurjot Singh Bhatti's GSoC work on curves for keyframes. This was more work than expected and we spent many hours trying fix the curves and make keyframes behave correctly. Not much time was left for sleep, but we still managed to get outside to make a group (!) picture in the woods above Lausanne.
  • Jekyll 3.x
    I’ve found three different types of transition issues (it is cool to look at these in a project I do not upgrade on a daily basis like Plasma and the rest of the KDE software).
  • kdev-python on Windows: try it!
    I spent the last two or three days playing around with KDE on Windows, with the aim of getting my Python language plugin for KDevelop to run there. In the end, it wasn’t that hard to get this to work — not as hard as I would have expected it to be, anyways.

Manjaro ARM launched

Hi community, wonderful news in regard of architecture expanding within Manjaro Linux. It all started with a simple post on our developers mailing list. Somebody wants to do Manjaro for ARM … Just after one month of development our first alpha release is now ready. So what is this all about? Manjaro Arm is a project aimed to bring you the simplicity and customability that is Manjaro to ARM devices. These devices are growing in numbers and can be used for any number of applications. Most famous is the Raspberry Pi series and BeagleBoard series. Read more

Plasma 5.5.4 and Calligra Suite 2.9.11 now available

The 4th update for KDE's Plasma 5.5.x series is now available to all Chakra users. According to the release schedule, unless new issues occur, this will be the last update for this series before 5.6 gets released next month. Plasma 5.5.4 as usually includes a month's translations and bugfixes, with the authors highlighting the improvements for handling multi-screen setups. The Calligra Suite also receives a bugfix update to version 2.9.11, which mainly provides fixes for krita and kexi. Read more