Language Selection

English French German Italian Portuguese Spanish

Antispam proposals advance

Filed under
Security

The Internet Engineering Steering Group (IESG), a division of the Internet Engineering Task Force (IETF), said it would publish two competing and overlapping sets of documents that define ways of confirming that e-mail senders are who they say they are.

The experimental Requests for Comment (RFCs)--Sender Policy Framework (SPF) for Authorizing Use of Domains in E-Mail and Sender ID: Authenticating E-Mail--have been the subject of intense jockeying by Microsoft, America Online and others.

Critics have accused Microsoft of trying to strong-arm the industry into accepting Sender ID. Concerns over Microsoft's Sender ID-related patents have alarmed some involved in setting standards, and last year the IETF let a Sender ID working group expire.

"While many proposals for domain-based authorization have been under consideration, no consensus has yet been reached concerning a single technical approach," the IESG said in a statement. "The IESG does not endorse either of the two mechanisms documented in the experimental RFCs--their publication is intended to encourage further discussion and experimentation in order to gain experience that can be used to write future standards in this space."

Microsoft said that despite the expiration of the Sender ID working group in September, the approval of the experimental RFCs showed that its technology is alive and well in the standards-setting process.

"We think this is great," said Samantha McManus, business strategy manager for Microsoft's technology care and safety group. "We're glad to see Sender ID's experimental status, and we think e-mail authentication is very important for addressing spam and phishing. That said, we definitely have more to do."

Full Story.

More in Tux Machines

Red Hat News

Development News: LLVM, New Releases, and GCC

PulseAudio 10 and Virtual GPU in Linux

  • PulseAudio 10 Coming Soon, Using Memfd Shared Memory By Default
    It's been a half year since the debut of PulseAudio 9.0 while the release of PulseAudio 10 is coming soon. PulseAudio 9.99.1 development release was tagged earlier this month, then usually after x.99.2 marks the official release, so it won't be much longer now before seeing PulseAudio 10.0 begin to appear in Linux distributions.
  • Experimenting With Virtual GPU Support On Linux 4.10 + Libvirt
    With the Linux 4.10 kernel having initial but limited Intel Graphics Virtualization Tech support, you can begin playing with the experimental virtual GPU support using the upstream kernel and libvirt.

Licensing FUD and Licensing Advice

  • On the Law and Your Open Source License [Ed: Black Duck is just a parasite selling proprietary software by bashing FOSS]
    "Looking back five or ten years, companies managing open source risk were squarely focused on license risk associated with complying with open source licenses," notes a report from Black Duck Software. Fast-forward to today, and the rules and processes surrounding open source licensing are more complex than ever.
  • Explaining the source code requirement in AGPLv3
    This condition was intended to apply mainly to what would now be considered SaaS deployments, although the reach of "interacting remotely through a computer network" should perhaps be read to cover situations going beyond conventional SaaS. The objective was to close a perceived loophole in the ordinary GPL in environments where users make use of functionality provided as a web service, but no distribution of the code providing the functionality occurs. Hence, Section 13 provides an additional source code disclosure requirement beyond the object code distribution triggered requirement contained in GPLv2 Section 3 and GPLv3 and AGPLv3 Section 6.