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Happy 30th Birthday, Linux!

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Linux

That’s right, it’s been 30 years since 21-year-old Finnish student Linus Benedict Torvalds made his now-famous announcement on the day of August 25th, 1991, on the comp.os.minix news group, saying that he is working on a free operating system for 386(486) AT clones as a “hobby.”

Well, that “hobby” turned into something massive in only 30 years (how time flies), and Linux now powers almost every smart device around you, including your Android smartphone, Amazon Alexa and Google Home smart assistants, big screen TV, smart fridge, smart lights, and especially your Wi-Fi router.

Read more

More on Linux @ 30

  • 30 Years Later, the Trajectory of Linux Is Star Bound | LinuxInsider

    When 21-year-old Linus Torvalds, a then computer science student from Helsinki, released a new type of computing system built on a kernel he created on Aug. 25, 1991, he laid the foundation for what became the Linux operating system.

    Today the Linux community is estimated to be 86 million users strong. It has become the backbone of large enterprises and is installed in government systems and embedded in devices worldwide.

    That percentage of Linux users is a bit misleading. When we dig down under that 86 million figure, we find that server, network, and enterprise use of Linux is extensive. But the number of desktop Linux users is vastly less large.

    [...]

    The Linux desktop offers users a reliable and rigorously secure computing alternative to Windows and macOS. But with no real marketing plan for desktop Linux, typical computer users are clueless that Linux exists as a viable and free operating system.

    Even computer users preferring other platforms benefit from Linux. It has been ported to more hardware platforms than any other operating system, thanks to the popularity of the Linux-based Android operating system.

  • Linux at 30: How Android came to be, well, Android

    Android is the world’s most beloved consumer operating system (OS), powering billions of smartphones, tablets, smart TVs, and other gadgets all around the globe. While there are many other popular operating systems in use, none have accomplished quite such a broad reach as Android. The OS’ success story is a long and winding one but today we’re looking back to the true origin story.

    Although Google (rightly) takes the credit for Android’s development, the operating system’s early building blocks owe their existence to the similarly ubiquitous but lesser-recognized Linux OS. Today, Linux distributions span Debian, Fedora, Ubuntu, and many, many others, powering PCs, servers, and Raspberry Pis all around the globe.

  • 30 Years ago...

    On August 25, 1991, Linus Torvalds posted his famous message to the comp.os.minix USENET group...

  • Happy 30th Birthday Linux | One Of The Biggest Day In The History Of Tech | Itsubuntu.com

    Today is the 30th birthday of our favorite operating system Linux. It is one of the biggest day in the history of technology. Right now, Linux is one of the most popular and powerful operating systems that is being used in wide range of sectors. It is powering laptops to mobiles, washing machines to super computers and so on.

  • Happy Birthday to Linux, 30 years strong | GamingOnLinux

    It was on this day 30 years ago that a younger Linus Torvalds announced a free operating system to the comp.os.minix group and from there it exploded across servers, desktops and plenty more.

    Now one of the most popular operating systems in the world, you can find it nearly everywhere you look including 100% of the top 500 supercomputers. There's a Linux distribution for everything, and Linux is what will also be powering the upcoming Steam Deck with Valve using SteamOS that's based on Arch Linux. What Torvalds said "won't be big and professional like gnu" has changed the world.

  • This is why Linux is not an operating system [Ed: Seems like a plagiarism site, just like this]

SJJN's coverage

  • Linux turns 30: The biggest events in its history so far | ZDNet

    A year by year summary of the most significant events in Linux's history to date.

  • Linux turns 30: ​Linus Torvalds on his "just a hobby" operating system

    In 1991, Unix was an important but secondary x86 operating system. That year, on August 25, a mild-mannered Finnish graduate student named Linus Benedict Torvalds announced on the Usenet group comp.os.minix that he was working on "a (free) operating system (just a hobby, won't be big and professional like gnu) for 386(486) AT clones." No one knew it, not even Torvalds, but the technology was going to change forever.

    [...]

    By the end of 1991, it was gaining more attention than the still-born GNU Hurd or Minix [Andrew Tannenbaum's ground-breaking free software educational Unix operating system]. Torvalds explained...

By Microsoft Tim

  • 30 years of Linux: OS was successful because of how it was licensed, says Red Hat

    On the 30th anniversary of the announcement of Linux by Linus Torvalds, Red Hat has said that it worked because of the way the OS was licensed.

    In a post today celebrating the anniversary, Red Hat said: "The reason that Linux has been arguably the most successful operating system of all time is due to the fact that its license allowed copying, improvement, distribution and required sharing of changes. (Note that the license does not require collaboration, but the reciprocal nature of Linux strongly encourages it.)"

5 More Items About Kernel at 30

  • Happy birthday, Linux: From a bedroom project to billions of devices in 30 years

    On August 25, 1991, Linus Torvalds, then a student at the University of Helsinki in Finland, sent a message to the comp.os.minix newsgroup soliciting feature suggestions for a free Unix-like operating system he was developing as a hobby.

    Thirty years later, that software, now known as Linux, is everywhere.

    It dominates the supercomputer world, with 100 per cent market share. According to Google, the Linux kernel is at the heart of more than three billion active devices running Android, the most-used operating system in the world.

    Linux also powers the vast majority of web-facing servers Netcraft surveyed. It is even used more than Microsoft Windows on Microsoft's own Azure cloud. And then there are the embedded electronics and Internet-of-Things spaces, and other areas.

    Linux has failed to gain traction among mainstream desktop users, where it has a market share of about 2.38 per cent, or 3.59 per cent if you include ChromeOS, compared to Windows (73.04 per cent) and macOS (15.43 per cent).

  • Happy Birthday, Linux: From a Bedroom Project To Billions of Devices in 30 Years

    On August 25, 1991, Linus Torvalds, then a student at the University of Helsinki in Finland, sent a message to the comp.os.minix newsgroup soliciting feature suggestions for a free Unix-like operating system he was developing as a hobby. Thirty years later, that software, now known as Linux, is everywhere.

  • Happy 30th Birthday to Linux! | UbuntuHandbook

    It was 30 years ago that Linus Torvalds announced the operating system, just a hobby!

  • Happy 30th Anniversary, Linux! We Love You So Much!

    Our lovely operating system Linux is turning 30 today so we will like to wish a very happy birthday to the Linux.

    It all started on August 25th, 1991. A single student, studying computer science at the University of Helsinki, made his now-legendary announcement (you can read the entire mailing thread here) on the comp.os.minix newsgroup:

  • Happy birthday – 30 Years of Linux | Ubuntu

    By adopting the GPL license, a free software license that essentially commits participating developers to grant their contributions to the Linux project into the public domain, the Linux operating system was able to successfully build up a complete, if at times discoherent platform that offers, for many users, power and flexibility with comparable or better features than proprietary solutions. Indeed, many other operating systems owe a great deal of their inspiration if not their codebase to the GNU/Linux project.

    Relying on a vast army of volunteer contributors from across the world, from the ranks of commerce, research, academia and government, Linux has grown to sit at the top table of computing over the past thirty years. It has arguably become an iconic emblem for human achievement.

    By gifting a mature, comprehensive, freely available and freely adaptable software base to the world, Linus and his project has granted us all a powerful and resilient resource for the future, regardless of what the future may bring.

3 More Articles About Kernel Turning 30

  • Linux, happy 30th birthday! What the future holds for Linux

    Today marks the official 30th birthday of the Linux operating system. Let's all dig into that penguin-shaped cake and talk about where we were when it all began. Or, maybe we'll chat about all of the fun times we've had with Linux over the years, or how it shaped our lives and altered the trajectory of our professional endeavors.

    Now let's talk about the future. After all, we know the past. We've learned from our mistakes and celebrated our successes. The thing about prognostication is that it's nothing more than a guessing game. But sometimes pondering what the future holds can be an enjoyable way of flexing the brain's muscles and positing a world of possibilities.

  • Linux Is 30

    Yes the number one open source operating system is 30 years old this month. Is it mature or geriatric? Why isn't it everywhere? After all, it is difficult to beat the economics of a free OS.

    The exact date to celebrate is usually the 25th of August 1991 because this is the date that Linus Benedict Torvalds broke cover with a post to the Minux newsgroup:

  • Linux turns 30, and today it’s everywhere

    It’s been three decades since Linus Torvalds announced plans to release a free and open source operating system with a Unix-like feature set. In that time Linux has come a long, long way.

    There are hundreds of desktop operating systems based on the Linux kernel, although they still have a pretty tiny market share when compared with Windows and macOS. But in some ways, Linux may be one of the world’s most versatile, most widely-used operating systems.

Linux Foundation post

  • Happy 30th, Linux!

    “I’m doing a (free) operating system (just a hobby, won’t be big and professional like gnu) for 386(486) AT clones. This has been brewing since april, and is starting to get ready. I’d like any feedback on things people like/dislike in minix, as my OS resembles it somewhat (same physical layout of the file-system (due to practical reasons) among other things).

    I’ve currently ported bash(1.08) and gcc(1.40), and things seem to work. This implies that I’ll get something practical within a few months, and I’d like to know what features most people would want. Any suggestions are welcome, but I won’t promise I’ll implement them :-)”

By Michael Tunnell

  • Happy Birthday Linux! 30 Years Ago Today, Linus Gave Us Linux! - Front Page Linux

    Happy 30th Birthday to the Linux kernel! 30 years ago today, August 25th, Linus Torvalds sent out an email to the Minix newsgroup announcing his new hobby project. This hobby became the biggest open source project ever created and arguably the most important software ever created. Linux is use in pretty much every type of computing device from Smartphones to Desktops, from Raspberry Pi’s to the new PineNote, or from Cars to the International Space Station!

Linux celebrates its 30th anniversary

  • Linux celebrates its 30th anniversary – Computer – .Geeks [Ed: Might be a plagiarism site]

    My first experience with Linux, if my memory didn’t fail me, was 20-30 years ago with a Redhat distribution in which I was experimenting with something on the command line. At the time, Linux was still too basic to use properly, but I was concerned with that.

Linux at 30: How Android came to be, well, Android

  • Linux at 30: How Android came to be, well, Android

    Android is the world’s most beloved consumer operating system (OS), powering billions of smartphones, tablets, smart TVs, and other gadgets all around the globe. While there are many other popular operating systems in use, none have accomplished quite such a broad reach as Android. The OS’ success story is a long and winding one but today we’re looking back to the true origin story.

    Although Google (rightly) takes the credit for Android’s development, the operating system’s early building blocks owe their existence to the similarly ubiquitous but lesser-recognized Linux OS. Today, Linux distributions span Debian, Fedora, Ubuntu, and many, many others, powering PCs, servers, and Raspberry Pis all around the globe.

A couple more

  • Three dates, not one, to mark creation of Linux: Torvalds

    "This was the anniversary of the first public announcement, but it wasn't actually the actual first code drop. That came later – 17 September.

    "And even that second anniversary isn't the 'last' anniversary, because the Linux 0.01 code drop on 17 September was only privately announced to people who had shown some interest from the first announcement.

    "So the first actually public and real *announced* code drop was 5 October 1991, which is when 0.02 was dropped. So I actually have three anniversaries, and they are all equally valid in my mind."

  • Linux turns 30 today, the open source operating system that changed everything

    In its origins, computing was controlled by universities, the military, and big business. They had control and licenses of the software, and no one could use the applications or operating systems without their permission, or a license.

    Richard Stallman, a programming genius who He studied at Harvard University and worked at IBM and at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT), working as a laboratory hacker, he decided to punch the table. The September 27, 1983 sent the now famous email to his colleagues, with the slogan “Free Unix!” (Free Unix!), Which gave rise to the birth of free software:

    “I consider that the golden rule requires that if I like a program, I must share it with other people who also like it. My conscience does not allow me to sign a confidentiality agreement or a software license.”

30 things you didn't know about the Linux kernel

The Linux kernel is turning 30 this year. That's three decades of pioneering open source software, enabling users to run free software, to learn from the applications they're running, and to share what they've learned with friends. It's argued that without the Linux kernel, the luxuries of open culture and free software we enjoy today may not have surfaced when they have. It's highly improbable that the parts of Apple and Microsoft and Google that are open would be open at all without Linux as the catalyst. The impact of Linux as a phenomenon for culture, software development, and user experience cannot be overstated, and yet it all started with a kernel.

A kernel is the software that boots a computer, recognizes—and ensures communication between—all of the components attached to the computer, both inside and outside of the computer case. For code that most users never even think about, much less understand, there are a lot of surprises about the Linux kernel. In no particular order, here's one fact about the kernel for each year of its life...

Read more

Trademark aspects

  • Tux: A brief history of the Linux mascot

    It wasn't until Linus Torvalds (the creator of Linux) mentioned that he was fond of penguins. That mention pretty much ended the debate and a penguin would become the mascot of Linux.

Linux is 30 years old

  • Linux is 30 years old

    Still not on the desktop but not even Steve Ballmer saw this day coming

    On August 25, 1991, Linus Torvalds, then a student at the University of Helsinki in Finland, sent a message to the comp.os.minix newsgroup soliciting feature suggestions for a free Unix-like operating system he was developing as a hobby.

Greg Kroah-Hartman Talks about Linux Turning 30

  • Greg Kroah-Hartman Talks about Linux Turning 30

    Linux has turned 30 years old, and the Linux kernel now runs at the heart of more than three billion active Android devices, making it the most-used operating system in the world.

    In this article, Thomas Claburn talks with Greg Kroah-Hartman, the Linux Foundation fellow who oversees stable Linux kernel releases and has worked on the kernel for more than 20 years, to learn about what's happened and where Linux is going.

Linux kernel modules we can't live without

  • Linux kernel modules we can't live without

    The Linux kernel is turning 30 this year! If you're like us, that's a big deal and we are celebrating Linux this week with a couple of special posts.

    Today we start with a roundup of responses from around the community answering "What Linux kernel module can you not live without? And, why?" Let's hear what these 10 enthusiasts have to say.

Linux Turns 30

  • Linux Turns 30 - 9 Things You Might Not Know About Linux

    On the 25th of August 1991, Linus Torvalds sent out his first message about a free operating system he was developing. For him it was “just a hobby” and “won’t be big and professional”, but it turned out to be way more than that. Now after 30 years, Linux is everywhere. Here are nine things that you may not know about Linux.

  • Linux at 30: How a student’s hobby became a key component in the business IT stack | TechRadar

    August 25, 2021 marked thirty years of Linus Torvalds’ now-famous announcement on the comp.os.minix news group, where he shared plans to work on a free operating system for 386(486) AT clones as a “hobby.”

    Nobody, least of all Torvalds, would have imagined that three decades later, his hobby OS would not just outgrow his personal computer, but go on to become the backbone of much of the modern IT world.

    Rob Gibbon, Product Manager at Canonical, the makers of Ubuntu, has seen an explosion in the adoption of Linux over the years.

Another piece

  • The evolution of Open Source - a retrospective as Linux turns 30-years-old

    Linux – the OS that changed the game, turned 30 on August 25th. DIGIT takes a look at how it started an open source revolution.

    On this day in 1991, 21-year-old Finnish student Linus Benedict Torvalds announced on the comp.os.minix news group that he was working on a free operating system (OS) for 386(486) AT clones as a “hobby.”

    This would eventually become Linux Kernel, an OS that started something of an open source revolution, changing the mindset of accepting the established products of those with the biggest marketing budgets, or tightest security, as ‘the best’.

    While it started out as a (better) alternative OS, mainly leveraged by computing enthusiasts, it has grown to be utilised in an astounding amount of devices.

From German

Looking back on 30 years of Linux history with Red Hat's Pete...

  • Looking back on 30 years of Linux history with Red Hat's Pete Zaitcev

    The Linux kernel and the second version of the GNU General Public License (GPLv2) turned 30 this year. As part of that major milestone we asked Red Hatters who have been using or contributing to Linux since the early days about their experiences. What was it like contributing to Linux, what was it like using it? Could you imagine that Linux would have the impact it's had on the world up until now?

    Today we’re talking to Pete Zaitcev, who has been contributing to Linux since the early 1990s, joining Red Hat in 2001. Pete now works as a Principal Software Engineer in Red Hat’s R&D OpenStack Platform team.

    [...]

    A: I do not remember what my first proper contribution was. I think it must have been a patch to fix pseudo-DMA in floppy.c in August 1995. Nobody cared who you were as long as the code was good. My first attempt was to make a raster console. It was required for SPARCstation, which did not have a text mode. The prime customer for that was David "DaveM" Miller, the leader of the port to SPARC. However, my code was over-engineered for what was needed. Although he accepted it in the Sparclinux tree initially, DaveM eventually ripped it out and replaced it with the raster console developed by Geert Uytterhoeven for Amiga. I remember being very disappointed. I wasn’t sure Dave even made the right call. Thereafter I stuck with minor fixes here and there.

Linux at 30: 5 Ways Linux has Changed Software Engineering...

#heiseshow: 30 years of Linux – an unusual success story

  • #heiseshow: 30 years of Linux – an unusual success story

    Linux celebrates its 30th birthday: On September 17, 1991, Linus Torvalds put the first version of his operating system kernel online, a good four weeks after he had made his work on it public. To this day, the free operating system has become one of the most important pillars in the software world. Torvalds still has the development firmly under control and, thanks to some peculiarities of Linux, can fall back on an impressive arsenal of helpers who keep adding new features. At the same time, everything runs as predictable as clockwork. Meanwhile, the size of the kernel continues to grow. In a new episode of the #heiseshow we talk to our expert Thorsten Leemhuis about the importance of Linux and how it will continue in the foreseeable future.

30 years of Linux

  • 30 years of Linux: B1 Systems donates 30,000 euros and wants to know to whom

    Linux celebrates its 30th birthday on September 17th and the system house B1 Systems, which specializes in open source, wants to share its joy with open source and social projects: The team around the penguin mascot is donating a total of 30,000 euros.

    Half of the total goes to social projects. No recipient has yet been determined for the remaining 15,000 euros. Open source fans can now choose which open source projects or non-profit associations that promote open source will receive the money.

Linux kernel turns 30: congratulations from PVS-Studio

  • Linux kernel turns 30: congratulations from PVS-Studio

    On August 25th, 2021, the Linux kernel celebrated its 30th anniversary. Since then, it’s changed a lot. We changed too. Nowadays, the Linux kernel is a huge project used by millions. We checked the kernel 5 years ago. So, we can’t miss this event and want to look at the code of this epic project again.

    [...]

    Last time we found 7 peculiar errors. It’s noteworthy that this time we’ve found fewer errors!

    It seems strange. The kernel size has increased. The PVS-Studio analyzer now has dozens of new diagnostic rules. We’ve improved internal mechanisms and data flow analysis. Moreover, we introduced intermodular analysis and much more. Why has PVS-Studio found fewer exciting errors?

    The answer is simple. The project quality has improved! That’s why we are so excited to congratulate Linux on its 30th anniversary.

    The project infrastructure was significantly improved. Now you can compile the kernel with GCC and Clang – additional patches are not required. The developers are improving automated code verification systems (kbuild test robot) and other static analysis tools (GCC -fanalyzer was implemented; the Coccinelle analyzer is enhanced, the project is checked through Clang Static Analyzer).

    However, we found some errors anyway Smile. Now we’re going to take a look at some really good ones. At least, we consider them “nice and beautiful” Smile. Moreover, it’s better to use static analysis regularly, not once every five years. You won’t find anything that way. Learn why it’s important to use static analysis regularly in the following article: “Errors that static code analysis does not find because it is not used.”

#TGIQF – The quiz about the 30th Linux birthday

  • #TGIQF – The quiz about the 30th Linux birthday

    The first version of the Linux open source operating system appeared 30 years ago. The former nerd system has turned into a versatile software substructure that now exists in a wide variety of application areas and hundreds of distributions that now run on billions of devices every day. Starting with conventional computers and servers, it has spread over the decades via Android to smartphones, smartwatches, on-board computers in cars and even industrial and rocket technology.

    The 22-year-old software developer Linus Torvalds, who was significantly involved in the creation of the first Linux version, is also the inventor of Git, the free version management software. More than a million commits were received in the Linux versions by August 2020 – over ten every hour and the trend is rising.

Automated translation

  • Linux turns 30: Success factors then and now [Ed: Automated translation]

    Congratulations on your 30th Linux! You saw the light of day on Friday thirty years ago, after Linus Torvalds had previously announced that you would appear on August 25th. You have retained some rough edges from your early days to this day. Don’t worry if someone holds them against you: critics often fail to realize that some of them are the reason for your triumph. On the anniversary, it is therefore a good idea to take a closer look at some of your characteristic properties.

Linus Torvalds reveals the 'true' anniversary...

  • Linus Torvalds reveals the 'true' anniversary of Linux code

    Linux kernel creator Linux Torvalds has announced Linux 5.15-rc2, the second release candidate for the next version of the Linux kernel.

    Torvalds's weekly Sunday wrap-up marked the progress in the Linux kernel but he has also taken the time to point out the thirtieth anniversary of Linux v0.01, which he uploaded from Helsinki on the evening of September 17, 1991.

Torvalds Has Revealed the Date of Linux's Real Birthday

  • Linus Torvalds Has Revealed the Date of Linux's Real Birthday

    Many people in the Linux community is celebrating Linux’s birthday on August 25, but is that the right date? Here’s the answer.

    We all know the story. In 1988, a young Finnish man entered the Helsinki University to study Computer Science. His name was Linus Benedict Torvalds. On August 25, 1991, after five months of development, the 21-year-old Linus Torvalds made his now-legendary announcement via mail to a Minix newsgroup.

    [...]

    For those who don’t know, Torvalds originally named his kernel “FREAX” – a mix of “free”, “freak” and and “x” (as an allusion to Unix). One can see that while Torvalds may be a great programmer and leader, he really should leave the process of naming projects to other people.

Linus Torvalds Recognizes Linux's 'True' 30th Anniversary Date

  • Linus Torvalds Recognizes Linux's 'True' 30th Anniversary Date

    While it's been argued that Linux has four different "birthdays," last Friday saw the 30th anniversary of Linux's very, very first release — version 0.01.

    That special first release "was never publicly announced, and I only emailed a handful of people in private about the upload," Torvalds remembered on the Linux kernel mailing list. He no longer has copies of those announcement emails, "so there's no real record of that. The only record of the date is in the Linux-0.01 tar-file itself, I suspect."

  • 30 years since the Linux 0.01 release

    This is just a random note to let people know that today is actually
    one of the core 30-year anniversary dates: 0.01 was uploaded Sept 17,
    1991.

    Now, that 0.01 release was never publicly announced, and I only
    emailed a handful of people in private about the upload (and I don't
    have old emails from those days), so there's no real record of that.
    The only record of the date is in the Linux-0.01 tar-file itself, I
    suspect.

    Alas, the dates in that tar-file are for the last modification dates,
    not the actual creation of the tar-file, but it does seem to have
    happened around 7:30pm (Finnish time), so the exact anniversary was
    technically a couple of hours ago.

The Soul of the Movement

  • The Soul of the Movement: 30 Years of Linux (Part 1)

    On August 19, 1991, Linus Torvalds, humbly conducted his own poll, querying interest in a Usenet posting to the comp.os.minix group at the University of Helsinki:

    I'm doing a (free) operating system (just a hobby, won't be big and professional like gnu) for 386(486) AT clones. This has been brewing since April and is starting to get ready. I'd like any feedback on things people like/dislike in minix, as my OS resembles it somewhat (same physical layout of the file-system due to practical reasons among other things).

    Just a hobby? In the middle of the "free software movement" and years ahead of the launch of "open source," a month later the first Linux kernel occupied 65 KB and had about 10,000 lines of Torvalds' code.

The Soul of the Movement: 30 Years of Linux (Part 2)

  • The Soul of the Movement: 30 Years of Linux (Part 2)

    The GNU Compiler Collection (GCC), a free software and mass collaboration project that Richard Stallman released in September of '83 is still around, but a competitor has emerged called LLVM. (LLVM is a collection of modular and reusable compiler and toolchain technologies, which has proliferated into an umbrella project consisting of several subprojects, many of which are being used in production by a wide variety of commercial and open source projects -the C compiler portion is called Plane). The Linux kernel was formerly compiled on GCC but can now be compiled LLVM.

    "GCC forked for a decade and it turned into the compiler egcs," VMware Open Source Engineer Steven Rostedt says. "Together again as one compiler-now, that's the power of open source! And as long as there's one person maintaining it, it lives. It doesn't depend on one company or funding. That's why I love open source."

    GNU C Library (glibc)

    The GNU C Library, commonly known as glibc, is the GNU Project's implementation of the C standard library. It was started in the 1980s by the Free Software Foundation for the GNU operating system. Most applications link to glibc.

    "C is still popular for systems programming," Rostedt says, "and it's compiler is written in C. C is flexible and robust because there's nothing hindering you. I like to think of it this way: with great power comes great responsibility-that's C. But no one wants to program in it because it's very dangerous; it doesn't protect you from hurting yourself-security and overflow bugs are commonplace. If you've written more than a hundred lines of code, you can bet there's a bug in it."

Potentially lousy source

  • How did 30-year-old Linux invade world?

    The hobby-based tinkering that was born out of a frustration with the shortcomings of the Minix system had generated the first version of the Linux operating system by 17th September. It was only 65 kilobytes and comprised some 10,000 lines of Torvalds’ code. Linux is based on open source code that can be modified by anyone.

    In comparison, the current Linux 5.14 contains over 3.3 million lines of code.

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  • How to install Adobe Flash Player on a Chromebook

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  • How to install OnlyOffice on Linux Lite 5.4 - Invidious

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  • Jenkins: How to add a JDK version - Anto ./ Online

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Development version: GIMP 2.99.8 Released

GIMP 2.99.8 is our new development version, once again coming with a huge set of improvements. Read more Some early coverage:

  • GIMP 2.99.8 Released with Clone Tool Tweaks, Support for Windows Ink

    A new development version of GIMP is available to download and it carries some interesting new features. While this isn’t a new stable release — GIMP 2.10.28 is the most recent stable release (and the version you’ll find in Ubuntu 21.10’s archives) — the release of GIMP 2.99.8 is yet another brick in the road to the long-fabled GIMP 3.0 release. And it’s a fairly substantial brick, at that.

  • GIMP 2.99.8 Released As Another Step Toward The Long Overdue GIMP 3.0

    GIMP 3.0 as the GTK3 port of this open-source Adobe Photoshop alternative has been talked about for nearly a decade now and the work remains ongoing. However, out today is GIMP 2.99.8 as the newest development snapshot.

Mozilla: Six-Year Moziversary, Thomas Park/Codepip, and Weak Response to Critics of Firefox Spyware

  • Chris H-C: Six-Year Moziversary

    I’ve been working at Mozilla for six years today. Wow. Okay, so what’s happened… I’ve been promoted to Staff Software Engineer. Georg and I’d been working on that before he left, and then, well *gestures at everything*. This means it doesn’t really _feel_ that different to be a Staff instead of a Senior since I’ve been operating at the latter level for over a year now, but the it’s nice that the title caught up. Next stop: well, actually, I think Staff’s a good place for now. Firefox On Glean did indeed take my entire 2020 at work, and did complete on time and on budget. Glean is now available to be used in Firefox Desktop.

  • Hacks.Mozilla.Org: Hacks Decoded: Thomas Park, Founder of Codepip

    Thomas Park is a software developer based in the U.S. (Philadelphia, specifically). Previously, he was a teacher and researcher at Drexel University and even worked at Mozilla Foundation for a stint. Now, he’s the founder of Codepip, a platform that offers games that teach players how to code. Park has made a couple games himself: Flexbox Froggy and Grid Garden.

  • Mark Surman: Exploring better data stewardship at Mozilla [Ed: Mozilla fails to admit that spying on Firefox users is wrong; now it's misframing the criticism and responds to a straw man]

    Over the last few years, Mozilla has increasingly turned its attention to the question of ‘how we build more trustworthy AI?’ Data is at the core of this question. Who has our data? What are they using it for? Do they have my interests in mind, or only their own? Do I trust them? We decided earlier this year that ‘better data stewardship’ should be one of the three big areas of focus for our trustworthy AI work. One part of this focus is supporting the growing field of people working on data trusts, data cooperatives and other efforts to build trust and shift power dynamics around data. In partnership with Luminate and Siegel, we launched the Mozilla Data Futures Lab in March as a way to drive this part of the work.