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Ultra-high speed network bows in Florida

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Sci/Tech

The Florida LambdaRail Network -- the next-generation Internet with 100 times the capacity of the previous system -- has gone live at 10 Florida universities.

The effort, spearheaded by the University of Florida, is part of National LambdaRail, a nationwide effort of research universities and technology companies using optical networking to boost both capacity and speed for data-intensive research.

"We`re talking about moving petabytes of data, where a petabyte is a million gigabytes," University of Florida physicist Professor Paul Avery said. "With the old system, it would have taken us months to download data that will now require only a few days."

"Everyone believes that high-speed networking and grid technology is the future of science," University of Florida Associate Provost Marc Hoit said.

Florida LambdaRail, which connects 10 universities through previously unused fiber optic cable, moves information at 10 gigabits per second.

A dozen other U.S. consortiums also worked on installing LambdaRail connections, but Florida`s is unique in that members have already paid for it, Hoit said.

UPI

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