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Debian 4.0 "etch" - GNU Kitchen Sink

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Linux
Reviews

Debian is one of the largest, oldest, and most democratic of all the Linux distributions out there. All of these points could be argued to be good or bad depending on your perspective.

Politics aside, there's no arguing Debian hasn't had a significant influence on the Linux world. It spawned Ubuntu, the now most popular desktop out there. It's sparked many a vociferous debate.

At the end of the day all I care about is whether or not I can use the damned thing. Let's see if nearly two years of development yielded any results.

Install:

I did something a little different this time around; I tried installing using the 150MB "netinstall" disc, which basically has just enough stuff on it to set up the basic system and lets you download the rest on demand over the internet.

Normally this isn't an option for me since I have notoriously slow and buggy internet connections most of the time. I got lucky this week.

Full Story.

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