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The Open Source Security Motherload: 105 Tools, Applications and Resources

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Software

Open source security is like a military general who shows his plans to both his allies and his enemies. On the one hand, his enemies can try to exploit the plan by targeting its weaknesses. But on the other hand, by exposing his tactics to those who want to help, the plan is ultimately much stronger as a result of their feedback and modifications.

Open source applications make their source code publicly available for any user to download, compile and execute. This makes it possible for developers to modify different aspects of the program to their needs. However, it also makes it extremely easy for malicious coders to find and use exploits in the software against unsuspecting users.

To prevent this from happening, open source software employs some of the highest forms of security around, and when it comes to open source security applications, that bar is set even higher. After all what good would a network firewall or intrusion detection system be if a user were able to penetrate the system because of an exploit in the source code?

In this article we have compiled 105 open source tools, applications, and resources to expose you to the diversity of open source options available, as well as to help you better assess the costs and benefits of open source security integration into your system.

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