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Timed shutdown in openSUSE: kshutdown

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HowTos

I never thought I’d need it, but today I did. I needed a timer (for shutdown) in linux.

context: I was doing some bittorrent downloads during an ISP limited timeframe. I had to finish by 8:00am otherwise it would cost me dearly!

tried and failed: I googled for “timed shutdown” and found two main solutions… THAT DIDN’T WORK in openSUSE.

So what worked?

More Here.

Timed shutdown in openSUSE: command line

you don't really have to search the whole web for an app that can pretty much do nothing more than what a simple command line can do, have you ever heard of shutdown?!! i guess not! when did opensuse users become so ignorant? read the man page!

re: time shutdown

yeah, it doesn't make sense does it? he starts off talking about shutting down a particular app, then settles for shutting down the whole system at a given time. I wondered why he didn't just install the atd.

re: time shutdown

lol, sometimes i forget that it's only a link, turned out somebody already told him about shutdown, it doesn't make sense because even HE doesn't know what he wants, he's just thinking out loud! apparently hes a former ubuntu user, it has a worse effect on users than microsoft windows lol

re: time shutdown

Quote:

apparently hes a former ubuntu user

teehee. Big Grin

Replying to "all of the above"

Hey give me a break, guys! Smile Anyway, I'm think I wasn't clear in my earlier post, so I've edited it.

Basically I was looking for a timer for system shutdowns and I couldn't find it in my default openSUSE installaton. Then when I looked on the web for "timed shutdown openSUSE" I couldn't find anything there either. Even my regular shutdown window does not give me options to restart computer in alternative operating systems. So anyway, for now I've found a solution that works. Maybe there will be better ways too.

ps. "former Ubuntu user"? wow, I didn't realise that that will be a stronger curse than "former Windows user". How the world has changed! Smile

re: all of above

nayk wrote:

ps. "former Ubuntu user"? wow, I didn't realise that that will be a stronger curse than "former Windows user". How the world has changed! Smile

lolol... naw it ain't that bad.

re: all of the above

srlinuxx wrote:
lolol... naw it ain't that bad.

I'm afraid you'll have to show your references on that statement for me to believe it.

Not even Mac Freaks out-dumb Ubuntu users!

re: all of the above

augh shucks, come on vonskippy, you being a bit hard on 'em. they in a strange environment trying to get stuff to work. it's a different time now. back in the old days, you had to read docs and use the commandline, so it's easy for us now. I think that's what's hurting the new linux user of today - they just don't want to use the commandline or learn how to read a man page. Without that basic foundation, it's like speaking another language from a phrase book. You might get a few things done, but you'll never understand what you are saying.

re: all of the above

I think you make a valid point.

In the "old" days, you turned to Linux because it would solve a problem (i.e. I need a web server or a custom firewall). It was worth the learning curve because it solved a problem and/or saved a ton of money.

Today, too many people treat Linux as a religion, and most of the newcomers have no clue what to expect, or why they should change OS's (after all, didn't their computer come with one - what's that one not doing that Linux will do?).

In any case, it's still amusing to make fun of stupid people (the fact that most ubuntu users seem to be a very large overlapping subset of stupid people is just a bonus).

I liked srrlx's comment on

I liked srrlx's comment on people not knowing the "linux" language, and thus missing the foundations of Linux. And that's obviously true.

But I liken Linux today to my transition from DOS to Windows phase. Earlier I thought I was pretty good at DOS. People would come to me to solve their Windows 95 problems, especially since Windows 95 kept crashing, DOS was more often than not the solution!

For me, Linux Desktop is currently in that phase... the Desktop just ain't good enough for problem solving. And so we return, and need to return, to "the code".

Hopefully though, the Desktop will evolve into a legitimate mature "graphic language" of its own... so that like XP/Vista is for DOS (and that's just an analogy I don't want a Linux that looks/works like windows)... Linux too would have a mature outward shell that would be legitimate and even beneficial for Linux problem solving.

Another anology is Dreamweaver, which offers a code-view along with a WYSIWYG layout for website design. In the early days, many web-designers rejected or scorned the WYSIWYG layout, preferring the pure-code view. But eventually it has become useful for problem solving and better website development.

Incidently as many (including me) learned html through the Dreamweaver interface, perhaps the Desktop linux will become a front-end to the code... better leading people to the true foundations of Linux-language.

And they say linux forums aren't elitist!

I just wanted to put it out there that the responses you people have given here to someone with a very simply query are pathetic. Linux ought to be mainstream so that as many people as possible can enjoy the benefits of open-source software, which are many. Arrogant, smug fools like yourselves only hinder that, because instead of the help they seek, they cop a rubbish attitude from fat old men who need a life. The irony here is that it is people like you who are stupid; you have forgotten what your precious code is for. Code in and of itself is worthless. It is the interactions with the user that it enables which have any value. An OS is an extension of this on a large scale. The OS basically makes your computer useful (it's almost a heavy paperweight without one). I mean, for god's sake, why does anybody write this stuff??? It's so people will actually use and benefit from it. If a GUI over your "code" makes it easier for a person to relate to it, then that's a bloody good thing. You know, old grannies use Linux too. And not everyone is a programming or console wizard. Nor should they have to be. I'm all for allowing software to be as customizable as one wants, but grant people every damn tool available to help them do it. I wouldn't use Linux if it were all console based, and nor would i have learned how to make it a viable system for my needs if everyone i asked for help was as grossly pompous as you lot. Fine, Ubuntu may not be to your taste, I don't like it either. But diversity is one of the strengths of Linux and its software, and without new users like the poor guy above, Linux would still be mostly an irrelevant toy for pimply nerds who need to get laid, instead of a promising alternative to a boring, monopolised system where profit is paramount, not the end-user. Lame, lame, lame. Get a life guys. And if your not gonna contribute to the community, get off the boards, write your crappy little console programmes, and continue to pat your smug selves on the back. No one else give a toss.

re: Elitist

Smug Elitists - you say that like it's a bad thing?

Technically, this isn't a forum, so without being too smug about it I'd like to point out this is a news site that allows comments. My comments have been called many things in the past but never Elite, so thanks, I'm flattered!

Don't take it personally

There's a couple things to keep in mind here:

  • If I can make a generalization, for a lot of Linux users, it's not just about having an OS to use, it's about having an OS to play with. And let's face it, using Linux isn't as easy as using Windows or OS X, where almost everything is hiding behind a pretty GUI. No one's complaining about that, but the flip side is that it does sort of give you "bragging rights."

    In fact, as time goes by, Linux hackers are writing more and more pretty GUIs to handle stuff that used to have to be done by hand; Automatix on Ubuntu/Mepis/Debian Etch is a prime example.

  • Boys will be boys -- everything's a competition; there's always someone out there who knows more than you do; you post something on a blog and get teased about it. Big deal.

  • Speaking on behalf of "fat old men who need a life" everywhere, I, um, resemble that remark! Smile

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