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Crowdfunding for the JingPad A1 Linux tablet begins

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Linux
Gadgets

The JingPad A1 is an 11 inch tablet with an AMOLED display, 8GB of RAM, 256GB of storage, and support for pen and touch input as well as an optional keyboard. But the main thing that sets the JingPad A1 apart from most tablets on the market is that it runs a custom Linux-based operating system called JingOS.

Chinese startup Jingling has been promoting the upcoming tablet for a few months, and now the company has launched a JingPad A1 crowdfunding campaign with Indiegogo.

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Kai-Fu Lee’s Sinovation bets on Linux tablet maker Jingling...

  • Kai-Fu Lee’s Sinovation bets on Linux tablet maker Jingling in $10M round

    Kai-Fu Lee’s Sinovation Ventures has its eyes on a niche market targeting software developers. In April, the venture capital fund led a $10 million angel round in Jingling, a Chinese startup developing Linux-based tablets and laptops, TechCrunch has learned. Other investors in the round included private equity firm Trustbridge Partners.

    Jingling was founded only in June 2020 but has quickly assembled a team of 80 employees hailing from the likes of Aliyun OS, Alibaba’s Linux distribution, Thunder Software, a Chinese operating system solution provider, and China’s open source community.

    The majority of the startup’s staff are working on its Linux-based operating system called JingOS in Beijing, with the rest developing hardware in Shenzhen, where its supply chain is located.

JingPad Linux Tablet Crowdfunding Campaign is Now Live

JingPad A1 Linux tablet launched for consumers on Indiegogo

  • JingPad A1 Linux tablet launched for consumers on Indiegogo

    There have been Linux tablets in the market for years if you consider that Android is Linux-based. There have also been attempts to put “proper” Linux flavors on phones and tablets, but most of those have been aimed at developers and tinkerers. Linux mobile devices that are designed specifically for the consumer market are far and few in between, making the JingPad Linux tablet a rather interesting venture, one that seems to have resounded with quite a few backers on Indiegogo.

JingPad Linux Tablet Crowdfunding Campaign is Now Live

  • JingPad Linux Tablet Crowdfunding Campaign is Now Live

    After months of teasing one, Chinese company Jingling has launched its crowdfunding campaign for the JingPad A1 Linux tablet on IndieGoGo.

    And within mere hours of the effort going live the JingPad reached its (peculiarly modest) goal of $20,000.

JingPad A1 Linux Tablet Sets to Begin Crowdfunding Campaign

  • JingPad A1 Linux Tablet Sets to Begin Crowdfunding Campaign

    JingPad A1 is an ARM-based tablet powered by JingOS an especially developed open-source Linux distribution.

    Chinese startup Jingling has been promoting the upcoming tablet for a few months, and now the company has launched a crowdfunding campaign with Indiegogo. At the time of writing this post 171 backers have pledged a combined total of almost $102,000. With 59 days left to go this figure is sure to rise.

    The consumer tablet market is saturated with either Google’s Android and Apple’s iPadOS as the only valiable oprions for OS. However, this changed back in March, when JingLing Tech, the Chinese startup company, unveiled a tabled running JingOS. JingOS is a convergent Linux-based open source OS. It offers a brand new way to merge mobile and desktop experiences. It can run both Linux apps and Android apps. JingOS is adapted to run naturally with touch screen, stylus, keyboard, and trackpad. The Linux distribution will open the door to all types of use but not necessarily to applications designed for touch.

"The JingPad A1 has finally reached Indiegogo..."

  • JingPad A1: Linux-based tablet with an AMOLED display blows through its Indiegogo campaign goal

    The JingPad A1 has finally reached Indiegogo, where it has already surpassed its funding target. According to Jingling, its manufacturer, the tablet amassed US$20,000 in funding within 15 minutes of going live on the crowdfunding website. As it stands, Jingling has raised over US$117,000 with 54 days of the campaign left to run.

    Jingling still has stock of its early bird pricing though, which it has set to US$549. This price includes an active stylus and a Wi-Fi version of the JingPad A1. The company is also selling a keyboard separately for US$149, or a bundle of the three products for US$699.

    To recap, Jingling has equipped the JingPad A1 with an 11-inch AMOLED display that runs at 2,368 x 1,728 pixels. The display has a 4:3 aspect ratio and supports 4,096 pressure levels. Jingling claims that the display reaches 350 nits and is TÜV certified, too.

JingOS, Linux-Based Operating System For Tablet And Smartphone!

  • JingOS, Linux-Based Operating System For Tablet And Smartphone!

    JingOS is a Linux-based operating system currently being developed by developers from China. This operating system is used on smartphones, tablets and desktop. If you look at the previous year. Many Linux distribution developers are developing it for Mobile devices.

    One of the famous is Ubuntu Touch which has been discontinued by Canonical. However, Ubuntu Touch is developed by the community. In addition there are other linux operating systems such as Postmarket OS, Librem5, Mobian, Manjaro, etc. Many developers develop it with privacy and security purposes.

    JingOS is also an Operating System developed for mobile devices. They developed a Linux-based operating system for their tablet, the JingPad A1. You can see the specifications here.

The JingPad A1 is a Feature-packed, Flagship Level… Linux Tablet

  • The JingPad A1 is a Feature-packed, Flagship Level… Linux Tablet?!

    An 11″, 2K, 4:3 AMOLED touchscreen. A 1.8GHz 8-core ARM SoC. 8GB of RAM. 256GB of storage. USB-C. An included stylus. Sounds like an awesome tablet right? But the thing that makes the JingPad A1 truly special is that it’s running JingOS, a Linux-based operating system.

    [...]

    As I said, the JingPad A1 comes with a stylus. But it also has an optional keyboard and trackpad accessory. I like the integrated kickstand. That’s a neat implementation.

The JingPad A1 is a Linux tablet that (kind of) runs Android app

  • The JingPad A1 is a Linux tablet that (kind of) runs Android apps

    There have been many attempts to create tablets running Linux, and even a few ones with ARM processors, like the Pine64 PineTab. However, another company is now giving it a shot, with an ARM Linux tablet that looks remarkably like an Apple iPad. It’s called the ‘JingPad,’ and at least on the surface, it seems like it could be a great device for anyone interested in Linux on a tablet.

    The JingPad is currently available for pre-order at Indiegogo, but don’t let its status as a crowdfunding project scare you away — the manufacturer has already sent out pre-production units to a few tech reviewers and news outlets. Early videos show off the tablet working as advertised, though there are a few software issues still being worked out.

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