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Mozilla: Why Desktop E-Mail Crucifies the Browser

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Interviews
Moz/FF

In an era when applications are moving into the web browser, the maker of the world's most popular open-source e-mail client wants you to stay on the desktop. Later this month, Mozilla will release Thunderbird 2, the latest version of its cross-platform e-mail application. The current version, 1.5, has almost 50 million users worldwide and has been translated into 35 languages. Built on the same technology as Mozilla's Firefox browser, it is loved by many for its advanced junk mail and filtering features, an integrated RSS news reader and the ability to customize with tons of add-ons. But with popular web-based e-mail services from Google, Microsoft and Yahoo, which offers unlimited storage, the need for a desktop e-mail client seems to be fading.

So we asked Scott MacGregor, Thunderbird's lead engineer, why anyone needs Thunderbird these days, and he had a pretty good answer. He also talked about Mozilla's open-source development model and told us what new features to expect when Thunderbird 2 becomes available.

Full Story.

re: Desktop email

atang1 wrote:
I never lost any email stored online.

But many people have. I only use my gmail account for trivial communication - never business.

Plus most email from the free webmail services (except for Gmail) is spam - I block all those domains (except google) at my firewall.

IMAP allows you to host your own email server (so you have no one to blame for data loss but yourself) AND lets you use any computer to view your stored messages.

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