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A Man Will Admit When He’s Wrong…

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After much thought on the matter, I really have no alternative but to come to you with hat in hand and offer an apology. I have received more than my share of emails, saying that I may be a bit “over the top” in my critisism of Windows Users who refuse to try or switch to Linux. I have been accused of displaying elitism, snobbery and just down-right rudeness. I have taken the time to read the handful of blogs written here and googled for my past articles on various websites. Yes, I have ragged on Windows Users and their obvious lack of judgement. Having been tagged as a “Linux Zealot” by some, I thought it was time to clear the air as it were, and take care of some long-overdue business.

In some of the pieces I have written I’ve noted thinly veiled innuendo’s, calling into question a person’s intelligence for using a product that not only fails them, but charges them exhorbitant amounts of money to do so. I have come very close to accusing some Windows Users of just being plain stupid and lazy. For anyone who perceived my words as a personal attack, I apologize. See, I’ve recently experienced a profound revelation. I now know the key reason most Windows Users ignore the intelligent choice when it comes to installing an operating system. Not only do I apologize, I offer my assistance to you. I am from Linux and I’m here to help. There is only one explanation that makes sense in all of this.

You suffer from the Stockholm Syndrome.

This has to be the reason so many normally intelligent people refuse to do the smart thing. You poor souls. All this time, in my elitist mind, I simply thought you were lazy and stubborn….maybe even a bit mentally deficient. Again, my apologies for these assumptions. You must have been through hell.

On behalf of all Linux Elitists, I apologize.

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